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Economic & Sector Work :: Pre-2003 Economic or Sector Report

Egypt : Social and Structural Review

ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS AGRICULTURE AIR QUALITY BALANCE OF PAYMENTS BARRIERS TO ENTRY BILATERAL TRADE BUDGET PROCESS BUDGETARY PROCESS BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT CAPITA GROWTH CENTRAL BANK CIVIL SOCIETY CLEAN WATER COMPETITIVENESS CONSUMERS CORPORATE SECTOR COST RECOVERY COST SAVINGS CURRENCY UNIT DEBT DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DEVELOPING COUNTRY DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY DIRECT IMPACT DIRECT INVESTMENT DIVISION OF LABOR DOMESTIC DEMAND DONOR COMMUNITY ECONOMIC CONDITIONS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE ECONOMIC POLICIES ECONOMIC TRENDS EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE RATE EXPORTS EXTERNAL DEBT EXTERNAL SHOCKS FINANCIAL SECTOR FOOD POLICY RESEARCH FOREIGN COMPETITION FOREIGN EXCHANGE FOREIGN INVESTORS FREE TRADE GDP GNP GNP PER CAPITA GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT GROWTH PERFORMANCE GROWTH RATES HEALTH CARE HOUSEHOLD DATA IMPORTS INCOME INCOME DISTRIBUTION INCOME GROUPS INCOME LEVELS INTERNATIONAL LEVELS LABOR FORCE LABOR MARKET LABOR SUPPLY LIQUIDITY LIVING CONDITIONS LIVING STANDARDS LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT LOW INCOME MACROECONOMIC STABILITY MACROECONOMICS MANUFACTURING SECTOR MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES MONETARY POLICY NATIONAL BUDGET PROCESS NATURAL RESOURCES NUTRITION OIL OUTPUT PER CAPITA POLICY CHOICES POLICY RESPONSE POPULATION GROWTH POVERTY LEVEL POVERTY LINE POVERTY REDUCTION POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY PRIMARY EDUCATION PRIORITY AREAS PRIVATE CONSUMPTION PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR DEVELOPMENT PRODUCERS PRODUCTIVITY PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH PROTECTIONISM PUBLIC EXPENDITURES PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR PERFORMANCE PUBLIC SERVICES PURCHASING POWER PURCHASING POWER PARITY REAL GNP REAL WAGES RECURRENT EXPENDITURES RESEARCH INSTITUTE RURAL AREAS SAFETY NET SAFETY NETS SERVICE DELIVERY SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL OUTCOMES SOCIAL SECTORS SOCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION TARIFF BARRIERS TASK TEAM LEADER TAX REFORM TAX REVENUE TAX REVENUES TAX SYSTEM TAXATION TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY TRADE BARRIERS TRADE LIBERALIZATION TRADE TAXES TRANSPARENCY UNEMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES WAGES ECONOMIC GROWTH EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES TRADE LIBERALIZATION MACROECONOMIC STABILITY TARIFFS GLOBAL INTEGRATION TRADE BARRIERS REGIONAL INTEGRATION LABOR MARKETS PUBLIC EXPENDITURES BALANCE OF PAYMENTS INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENTS PRIVATIZATION BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT BUDGET PROCESS CIVIL SERVICE UNEMPLOYMENT UNDEREMPLOYMENT WAGES SOCIAL SAFETY NETS EDUCATION SECTOR HEALTH POVERTY REDUCTION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
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Washington, DC
Middle East and North Africa | Egypt, Arab Republic of
2013-09-03T20:20:27Z | 2013-09-03T20:20:27Z | 2001-06-20

A social and structural review (SSR) identifies the strategic policy priorities that are likely to yield the highest returns in terms of poverty reduction and development. This SSR identifies those priorities by providing a systematic evaluation of economic policy and structure in order to identify a) the main constraints on poverty reduction and long run development in Egypt and b) the sources of vulnerability, particularly as Egypt considers further global integration through entering into foreign trade agreements. The five priorities for reform include: 1) In order to maintain Egypt's robust economic performance of the late 1990s, the Government will need to continue to maintain stability of the macroeconomic environment by strengthening economic management which may have been pushed off-course by exogenous shocks in the latter half of the 1990s. 2) Trade liberalization remains as an unfinished and critical area for further reform. By sharply reducing tariffs and other trade taxes, especially on manufactures, Egypt can achieve productivity gains and wage growth. 3) It is important to revisit government regulations that increase the cost of doing business in Egypt. 4) Expenditures of the bottom half of population appear to be fairly compressed. 5) The quality of life of population is in part determined by public services such as those that enhance health, education, sanitation, clean water, and air quality.

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