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Biological Resource Management : Integrating Biodiversity Concerns in Rural Development Projects and Programs

ADVERSE EFFECTS AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AGRICULTURE ANIMALS BIODIVERSITY BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY BIOLOGY BIOSPHERE CARBON CLIMATE COASTAL WETLANDS COMMON PROPERTY COMPOST COMPOSTING CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK CONSERVATION CROP PRODUCTION CROPS CULTIVARS CULTIVATION DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS DIRECT VALUE ECOLOGY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC GOODS ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC INCENTIVES ECONOMIC STRUCTURES ECONOMIC UTILITY ECONOMIC VALUE ECOSYSTEMS ENDANGERED SPECIES ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION PLANS ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT EXISTENCE VALUE EXISTENCE VALUES EXTERNAL COSTS FARMS FERTILITY FOREST LAND FORESTRY FORESTS FRUIT GENES GENETIC MATERIAL GENETIC RESOURCES GENETIC VARIABILITY GRASSES GROUNDWATER HABITAT HABITATS HOUSING HUMAN ACTIVITIES HUMAN ACTIVITY HUNTING INCOME INDIRECT USE INTRINSIC VALUE LANDRACES LEGISLATION LEISURE LOCAL BIODIVERSITY LOGGING MARGINAL AREAS MULCH NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION PLANS NATIONAL PARKS NATURAL CAPITAL NATURAL RESOURCES NATURAL SELECTION NATURE NON-USE VALUES NUTRIENT CYCLING OPPORTUNITY COST PESTS PLANTATIONS POPULATION GROWTH PREDATORS PRESERVATION PRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS PRODUCTIVITY PROPERTY RIGHTS PROTECTED AREAS PUBLIC GOOD RECREATION RECYCLING RURAL DEVELOPMENT SCARCITY VALUE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT TIMBER TOTAL ECONOMIC VALUE UNCERTAINTY USE VALUE VALUATION VARIETY VEGETATION WASTE ASSIMILATION WATERSHED WETLANDS WHALES WILDERNESS WILDLIFE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT RESOURCES MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION PROJECT DESIGN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY PEST MANAGEMENT STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PARTICIPATORY PROCESS
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Europe and Central Asia
2014-05-14T19:41:29Z | 2014-05-14T19:41:29Z | 2002-01

The aim of this study is to improve understanding of how biological resource conservation concerns can be better incorporated into projects and programs that primarily address the objective of rural development rather than environmental conservation. A multi-disciplinary study team was assembled and six background papers produced, along with the main overview paper. The six papers were on: 1) measuring biodiversity, predicting impacts, and monitoring change; 2) integrated pest management and biodiversity conservation; 3) biodiversity conservation in agricultural landscapes in Britain: relevant issues for developing countries; 4) reconciling biodiversity and development issues in practice; the search for a win-win situation in Ghana's coastal wetlands; 5) strategies for biodiversity conservation: examples from Tanzania; and 6) participatory initiatives in biodiversity conservation: lessons from experience. A study was also made of World Bank policies and procedures relating to biodiversity management and rural development together with three portfolio reviews. These findings were incorporated into this paper. This paper argues that bioresources and people's livelihood systems are intricately interrelated, and opportunities for intervention for development purposes must start from good understanding of different people's access to and use and management of these resources, and also the incentives, constraints, and institutional factors governing the process.

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