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Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper

Professional Services and Development : A Study of Mozambique

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE ACADEMIC YEAR ACCOUNTING ADMINISTRATIVE BURDEN ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS APPROPRIATE TRAINING AVERAGE WAGES BALANCE SHEETS BANK LOAN BANKS BARRIERS TO ENTRY BENEFICIARY BINDING BUSINESS COMMUNITY CALCULATION CAPITAL MARKET CAREERS CASH FLOW COMMERCIAL BANKS CONSULTING FIRMS CONSUMERS CONTRIBUTIONS COST RECOVERY COSTS OF EDUCATION CURRENT RATES CURRICULA CURRICULAR REFORM DEBT DEBT RELIEF DEGREES DIDACTIC MATERIALS EARNINGS EDUCATED CITIZENS EDUCATED INDIVIDUALS EDUCATED WORKERS EDUCATION DEGREES EDUCATION LEVEL EDUCATION POLICIES EDUCATION SERVICES EDUCATION SPECIALISTS EDUCATION SYSTEMS EDUCATION TEACHERS EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM EDUCATORS EMPLOYMENT ENGINEERING EDUCATION ENROLLMENT RATE ENROLLMENT RATES FINANCIAL CONSTRAINTS FINANCIAL INCENTIVES FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL MARKET FOREIGN PROFESSIONALS FOREIGN STUDENTS FORMS OF EDUCATION HIGHER EDUCATION HIGHER EDUCATION LAW HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN RESOURCES INCOME LEVEL INCOMES INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTEREST RATE INTERNSHIPS INVESTMENT CLIMATE LABOR FORCE LABOR MARKET LARGE ENTERPRISES LARGE FIRMS LEARNING LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES LECTURES LEVEL OF EDUCATION LEVEL OF SKILL LEVELS OF EDUCATION LIBRARIES LINGUISTIC DIFFERENCES LOW-INCOME LOWER LEVELS OF EDUCATION MATHEMATICS MEDICAL SERVICES MINIMUM WAGE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MOBILITY NATIONAL ECONOMY NATIONAL EDUCATION NUMBER OF STUDENTS PAPERS PERFORMANCE OF STUDENTS PHYSICS POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTES PRIMARY EDUCATION PRIMARY SCHOOL PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES PRIVATE UNIVERSITY PRODUCTIVITY PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS PROFESSIONAL TRAINING PROFESSORS PUBLIC GOOD PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES PUBLIC UNIVERSITY PUPIL-TEACHER RATIO QUALITY OF HIGHER EDUCATION RATES OF GROWTH READING REAL COST REGIONAL TRAINING REPAYMENT REPAYMENT RATES REPETITION RESEARCH ASSISTANCE RETURNS TO EDUCATION SALARIES SALARY SALE SALES SCHOLARSHIP SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS SCHOLARSHIPS SCHOOL EDUCATION SCHOOL TEACHERS SCHOOLS SCIENTISTS SEASONAL WORKERS SECONDARY EDUCATION SECONDARY SCHOOL SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADUATES SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS SENIOR SKILL DEVELOPMENT SKILL LEVELS SKILLED PEOPLE SKILLED WORKERS SKILLS ACQUISITION SMALLER FIRMS SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SECURITY SOCIAL SERVICES STAKEHOLDERS STOCK EXCHANGE STUDENT COSTS STUDENT FINANCIAL AID STUDENT LEARNING STUDENT LOAN STUDENT LOAN BENEFICIARIES STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM STUDENT LOAN PROGRAMS STUDENT LOAN REPAYMENTS STUDENT LOAN SCHEMES STUDENT LOANS STUDENT POPULATION TEACHER TEACHER EDUCATION TEACHER TRAINING TEACHERS TEACHING TECHNICAL EXPERTISE TECHNICAL EXPERTS TECHNICAL TRAINING TELECOMMUNICATIONS TERTIARY EDUCATION TERTIARY EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS TERTIARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT TRAINING CENTERS TRAINING INSTITUTIONS TRAINING PROGRAMS TRANSACTION TUITION TUITION FEES TUTORS UNIVERSITIES UNIVERSITY DEGREE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS VALUABLE VOUCHERS WAGE WAGES WORK EXPERIENCE WORKERS WORKING CAPITAL WORKING HOURS
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Africa | Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | Southern Africa | Mozambique
2012-03-19T19:09:21Z | 2012-03-19T19:09:21Z | 2009-03-01

Professional skills are scarce in Mozambique, even by the standards of low-income countries. The solution, however, is not necessarily to create more Mozambican training institutions but to address market-specific problems. Where skills are already the binding constraint (for example, in auditing and engineering), policy action is indeed needed to remedy supply-side problems: capital market imperfections that inhibit investment in training institutions by entrepreneurs and in education by individuals; weakness in upstream school education, which handicaps Mozambican students in their pursuit of higher education; inadequacies in professional education and training, including curricula not attuned to industry needs; and a fragmentation of the regional education market by regulatory and language differences that prevent the emergence of regional institutions that can exploit economies of scale.Where skills may be limited but are not yet the binding constraint, the priority is to stimulate demand for appropriate skills. In this respect, the emergence of professional guilds offers opportunities, but also creates risks. The guilds can design, with government support, a regulatory framework, for example, in accounting and basic engineering, which is more attuned to the needs of Mozambican firms. They can also help make firms more aware of the benefits of professional help, for example, in accounting and information technology. The risk is that guilds will create unnecessary regulatory barriers to entry, particularly for foreign or foreign-trained professionals. Greater coherence between policies affecting professional services and international migration policy can help deal with both supply-side and demand-side problems.

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