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Malawi’s Infrastructure : A Continental Perspective

ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ACCESSIBILITY AIR AIR SAFETY AIR SPACE AIR TRAFFIC AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL AIR TRANSPORT AIRPORTS APPROACH ASSET MAINTENANCE AVAILABILITY BALANCE BANDWIDTH BOTTLENECKS BRIDGE CABLE CAPITAL EXPENDITURE CAPITAL INVESTMENT CAPITALS CARRIERS CARS CONCESSION COST OF POWER COST RECOVERY COSTS OF POWER COUNTRY COMPARISONS CUBIC METER DEFICITS DISTRIBUTION LOSSES ECONOMIC GROWTH ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ELECTRICITY TARIFFS ELECTRIFICATION FINANCIAL BURDEN FINANCIAL DATA FREIGHT FUEL FUTURE INVESTMENTS GENERATION GENERATION CAPACITY GENERATION OF ELECTRICITY GENERATORS GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT GROWTH RATES HOUSEHOLD BUDGETS HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION HOUSEHOLDS HYDROPOWER INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC INVESTMENT PROGRAM INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS INVESTMENT TARGETS INVESTMENTS IN POWER KILOWATT-HOUR LEGAL FRAMEWORK LEVEL OF CONCENTRATION LITERS PER CAPITA PER DAY LOCOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS MARGINAL COST MARKET ACCESS MINERAL RESOURCES MONTHLY WATER BILL NATURAL RESOURCES O&M OPEN ACCESS OPERATING COSTS OPERATING EXPENDITURES OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS POWER POWER CONSUMPTION POWER GENERATION POWER GENERATION CAPACITY POWER GRID POWER PRODUCTION POWER SECTOR POWER TRADE PRIVATE OPERATORS PRIVATE PARTICIPATION PRIVATIZATION PRODUCTIVITY PROVISION OF WATER PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE PUBLIC PRIVATE INFRASTRUCTURE PUBLIC SECTOR RAIL RAIL LINKS RAIL NETWORK RAIL OPERATOR RAIL TRAFFIC RAILWAY RAILWAYS REGIONAL TRANSPORT REGULATORY AGENCY RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS REVENUE COLLECTION ROAD ROAD INVESTMENT ROAD MAINTENANCE ROAD NETWORK ROAD QUALITY ROAD SECTOR ROAD TRAFFIC ROAD TRANSPORT ROADS ROUTE RURAL WATER SAFETY SANITATION SANITATION UTILITIES SURFACE WATER TAX TOLL TRAFFIC DENSITY TRAFFIC VOLUMES TRANSIT TRANSPORT TRANSPORT INDUSTRY TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE TRANSPORT MARKET TRANSPORT POLICY TRANSPORT QUALITY TRANSPORT SECTOR URBAN TRANSPORT URBAN WATER URBAN WATER SUPPLY URBAN WATER UTILITIES UTILITY BILLS UTILITY DISTRIBUTION VEHICLE VEHICLES WATER CONSUMPTION WATER POLICY WATER RESOURCE WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WATER RESOURCES WATER SECTOR WATER SECTOR REFORM WATER SERVICES WATER SOURCE WATER SUPPLY WATER TARIFFS WATER USER WATER UTILITIES WELLS
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Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | Southern Africa | Malawi
2012-03-19T18:01:04Z | 2012-03-19T18:01:04Z | 2011

Infrastructure contributed 1.2 percentage points to Malawi's annual per capital GDP growth over the past decade. Raising the country's infrastructure endowment to that of the region s middle-income countries could increase that contribution by 3.5 percentage points. Malawi's successes in infrastructure development include reaching the Millennium Development Goals for water and making GSM telephone signals widely available without public subsidy. Challenges include improving the reliability and sustainability of the power sector, raising funding for road maintenance, preventing overengineering of roads, enhancing market access in agricultural areas, and lowering the cost of information and communications services. The latter goal may be achievable by securing competitive access to the new submarine infrastructure on the East African coast.Addressing Malawi's infrastructure deficit would require sustained expenditures of almost $600 million per year over the decade 2006-15. During the mid-2000s, the country spent close to $200 million per year, about half of which went to the transport sector. Because of widespread inefficiencies -- underpricing of power, improperly maintained roads, and utility distribution losses --about $200 million is wasted each year. But even if those inefficiencies were eliminated, Malawi would still face an annual infrastructure funding gap of almost $300 million. That gap could be cut to $100 million by engaging in regional trade of electricity, using lower-cost technologies in water and sanitation, and adopting less-ambitious road-building technologies. If inefficiencies were eliminated and recent spending levels sustained, Malawi could reach its infrastructure targets within 16 years.

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