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Journal Article

Density versus Quality in Health Care Provision : Using Household Data to Make Budgetary Choices in Ethiopia

ADULT MORTALITY ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY BUDGET ALLOCATION CAPITAL COSTS CAPITAL EXPENDITURE CAPITAL SPENDING CHILD HEALTH CLINICS COMMUNITIES COST OF HEALTH CARE COST-EFFECTIVENESS DEMAND FOR HEALTH DEMAND FOR HEALTH CARE DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH DIAGNOSIS DIARRHEA DISEASE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS DRESSINGS DURATION OF ILLNESS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC REVIEW EQUALITY ESSENTIAL DRUGS EXPENDITURES FAMILY PLANNING FEMALE FINANCIAL INFORMATION GRID HEALTH CARE HEALTH CARE DEMAND HEALTH CARE EXPENDITURES HEALTH CARE FACILITIES HEALTH CARE FINANCING HEALTH CARE POLICY HEALTH CARE PROVISION HEALTH CARE QUALITY HEALTH CARE SERVICES HEALTH CARE SYSTEM HEALTH CENTERS HEALTH CLINICS HEALTH COSTS HEALTH DATA HEALTH ECONOMICS HEALTH EXPENDITURE HEALTH EXPENDITURES HEALTH FACILITIES HEALTH ORGANIZATION HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH PLAN HEALTH POLICY HEALTH PRODUCTION HEALTH PROGRAMS HEALTH PROVIDERS HEALTH PROVISION HEALTH SECTOR HEALTH SERVICE HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH WORKERS HOSPITALS HOUSEHOLD DEMAND HOUSEHOLD DEMAND FOR HEALTH CARE HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE HOUSEHOLD INCOME HOUSEHOLDS HUMAN RESOURCES ILLNESS ILLNESSES IMMUNIZATION INCOME INCOME EFFECT INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS INTERVENTIONS LIFE EXPECTANCY LOW-INCOME COUNTRIES MALARIA MALNUTRITION MEDICAL CARE MEDICAL TREATMENT MEDICINE MORTALITY NUTRITION PATIENTS PHARMACIES PHARMACY POLICY RESEARCH PREVENTATIVE TREATMENT PRIMARY CARE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SERVICES PRIVATE HOSPITALS PRIVATE PHARMACIES PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTORS PROBABILITY PUBLIC EXPENDITURE PUBLIC EXPENDITURE ON HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH CARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES PUBLIC PROVISION PUBLIC SECTOR QUALITY OF HEALTH QUALITY OF HEALTH CARE RISK SHARING RURAL AREAS RURAL DEVELOPMENT SEX SOCIAL SCIENCE SOCIAL SCIENCES SYMPTOMS VILLAGES WORKERS
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Washington, DC: World Bank
Africa | Ethiopia
2014-03-04T19:50:53Z | 2014-03-04T19:50:53Z | 2002-09

Usage of health facilities in Ethiopia is among the lowest in the world; raising usage rates is probably critical for improving health outcomes. The government has diagnosed the principal problem as the lack of primary health facilities and is devoting a large share of the health budget to building more facilities. But household data suggest that usage of health facilities is sensitive not just to the distance to the nearest facility but also to the quality of health care provided. If the quality of weak facilities were raised to that currently provided by the majority of facilities in Ethiopia, usage would rise significantly. National data suggest that given the current density and quality of service provision, additional expenditure on improving the quality of service delivery will be more cost-effective than increasing the density of service provision. The budget allocation rule presented in the article can help local policymakers make decisions about how to allocate funds between improving the quality of care and decreasing the distance to the nearest health care facility.

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