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Economic & Sector Work :: Other Public Sector Study

Sierra Leone : Strategic Options for Public Sector Reform

ACCOUNTABILITY ACCOUNTING ADB ADMINISTRATIVE AUTONOMY ANTI-CORRUPTION AUDITING AUDITORS AUTHORITY BUDGET EXECUTION BUDGET FORMULATION CAPACITY BUILDING CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CITIZENS CIVIL SERVICE CIVIL SOCIETY CIVIL WAR COLONIZATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CONSENSUS CORRUPT PRACTICES COST EFFECTIVENESS DECENTRALIZATION DECISION-MAKERS DECONCENTRATION DEMOCRACY DEVELOPMENT WORK DEVOLUTION DISTRICTS ECONOMIC DECLINE ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ENFORCEABILITY EXECUTION EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURE MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL RESOURCES FISCAL FISCAL REVENUES GENERAL ELECTIONS GOVERNANCE ISSUES GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS GOVERNMENT SECTOR GROUP DISCUSSIONS HUMAN RESOURCE IMPROVING GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS INSTITUTIONAL CONSTRAINTS INSTITUTIONAL PERFORMANCE INTERNAL AUDIT LAWS LOCAL ADMINISTRATION LOCAL ADMINISTRATIONS LOCAL AUTHORITIES LOCAL COUNCILS LOCAL GOVERNMENT LOCAL LEVEL LONG TERM LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT MARKET ACTIVITIES NATIONAL BUDGET NATIONAL LEVEL NATIONAL POLICY PARASTATAL SECTOR PARASTATALS PARLIAMENT PARLIAMENTARY OVERSIGHT PERFORMANCE INDICATORS POLICY ANALYSIS POLICY PROCESS POLITICAL ELITE POLITICAL INFLUENCE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS POLITICAL PARTIES POLITICAL PARTY POOR COUNTRIES POOR GOVERNANCE POVERTY REDUCTION POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY PRIME MINISTER PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION INSTITUTIONS PUBLIC FINANCES PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS PUBLIC MANAGEMENT PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYMENT PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM PUBLIC SERVICE PUBLIC SERVICES PUBLIC TRANSPORT QUANTITATIVE DATA REFORM PROGRAMS REPRESENTATIVES SECTOR POLICY SERVICE DELIVERY SOCIAL SERVICES STATE APPARATUS STATE FAILURE STATE POLITICS STATE REVENUES STRUCTURAL REFORMS TASK TEAM LEADER TAX TAXATION TRADE UNIONS TRANSPARENCY WAGES WIDESPREAD CORRUPTION YOUNG PEOPLE YOUTH PUBLIC SERVICE DELIVERY REFORM POLICY PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION STRATEGIC PLANNING ACCESSIBLE SERVICES DEPENDENCY BURDEN NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS EXPENDITURE PATTERNS MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY WEAK COMPLEMENTARITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION POLICY FORMATION PROGRAM MANAGEMENT DECENTRALIZATION CAPACITY BUILDING
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Washington, DC
Africa | Sierra Leone
2013-07-29T18:39:13Z | 2013-07-29T18:39:13Z | 2003-08-05

The purpose of this paper is to outline strategic options for the reform of the public sector. The strategic options will be based upon an analysis of the public sector emerging from the civil war, and a longer period of deterioration and decline. The strategy will be expressed in very broad-brush form; detailed planning will only be possible once the basic strategic decisions have been taken. Years of corrupt, and ineffective government, causing - as well as compounded by - civil war, have left Sierra Leone with poor access to basic services, especially outside Freetown, with substantial dependence on NGOs. Expenditure management is weak; there is no effective accountability; human capacity is weak throughout the public service; and, the management of policy, and programs is highly centralized in Freetown, and in the Office of the President, and the Ministry of Finance. Nonetheless, there is now a strong consensus in favor of reforming the policy process, expenditure management, and accountability. And, there is an ever stronger determination to decentralize the delivery of basic services. The "options" concern the rate of decentralization. But, there is little worldwide experience to suggest that rapid devolution can work in terms of improving service delivery. Sierra Leone will need to be creative about the capacity issue: capacity does not have to be produced by the public sector, but capacity existing elsewhere can be effectively utilized by the public sector. So the recommended option is to act aggressively to build capacity to support the soon-to-be newly elected local councils. And to be sure to allocate the funds needed to support their responsibilities for basic service delivery, which would be expanded as the councils demonstrate their capacity to perform.

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