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Reducing Maternal Mortality : Learning from Bolivia, China, Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe

ANTENATAL CARE BABIES BIRTHING CENTERS BIRTHRATE BIRTHS CHILD HEALTH CHILDBIRTH CLINICS CONTRACEPTIVE PREVALENCE CONTRACEPTIVE PREVALENCE RATE DELIVERY CARE DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS DOCTORS DRUGS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EMERGENCY OBSTETRIC CARE EPIDEMIOLOGY EXPENDITURES FAMILIES FAMILY HEALTH FAMILY PLANNING FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES FEMALE PATIENTS FERTILITY HEALTH HEALTH CARE HEALTH CENTERS HEALTH FACILITIES HEALTH FACILITY HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH PROGRAMS HEALTH PROVIDERS HEALTH SECTOR HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH SYSTEM HEALTH SYSTEMS HEALTH TRAINING HOSPITAL BIRTHS HOSPITALS HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS HYGIENE HYPERTENSIVE DISORDERS IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME IMMUNODEFICIENCY INTERVENTION LIVE BIRTHS MANAGERS MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH CARE MATERNAL DEATH MATERNAL DEATHS MATERNAL HEALTH MATERNAL HEALTH CARE MATERNAL MORTALITY MATERNAL MORTALITY RATIO MATERNITY CARE MCH MEDICAL PERSONNEL MEDICAL SUPPLIES MIDWIFERY MIDWIVES MODERN CONTRACEPTION MORTALITY MOTHERS NATIONAL FAMILY PLANNING COUNCIL NURSES NUTRITION NUTRITION OBSTETRIC CARE OBSTETRIC EMERGENCIES PATIENTS PEER REVIEW POSTPARTUM PERIOD PREGNANCY PREGNANT WOMEN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PRIVATE CLINICS PRIVATE SECTOR PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS PUBLIC HEALTH QUALITY CONTROL REFERRAL HOSPITALS REPRODUCTIVE AGE RISK ASSESSMENT RISK FACTORS SAFE MOTHERHOOD SAFETY SERVICE DELIVERY MODELS STD SURGERY TETANUS TOTAL FERTILITY RATE TRADITIONAL BIRTH ATTENDANTS TRAINED MIDWIFE WORKERS MATERNAL MORTALITY CASE STUDIES PREGNANT WOMEN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS HEALTH PROGRAMS HEALTH PROVIDERS BIRTH ATTENDANTS HEALTH CARE FACILITIES OBSTETRIC HOSPITALS HEALTH POLICY SAFE MOTHERHOOD HEALTH CARE FINANCING
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Washington, DC: World Bank
Africa | East Asia and Pacific | Latin America & Caribbean | Middle East and North Africa | Bolivia | China | Egypt, Arab Republic of | Honduras | Indonesia | Jamaica | Zimbabwe
Koblinsky, Marjorie A.
2013-08-19T17:15:45Z | 2013-08-19T17:15:45Z | 2003-04

Of the 515,000 maternal deaths that occur every year worldwide, 99 percent take place in developing countries. Women In the developing world have a 1 in 48 chance of dying from pregnancy-related causes; the ratio in industrial countries is 1 in 1,800. Of all the human development indicators, the greatest discrepancy between industrial, and developing countries is in maternal health. The stimulus for this study was the question - Can current program strategies reduce maternal mortality faster that the decades required in the historically successful countries of Malaysia, and Sri Lanka? The answer was no. Based on case studies in seven selected countries, the study stipulates the factor common to all reviewed programs, is the high availability of a provider who is, either a skilled birth attendant, or closely connected with a capable referral system. A second common factor is the high availability of facilities that can provide basic, and essential obstetric care. But, unlike historic successes however, strong government policy now focuses explicitly on safe motherhood, and sets the tone for programs in most of the selected countries. Another difference between the case studies selected, and that in historically successful countries, is the financing of services: while service were free to families in Malaysia and Sri Lanka, costs of safe motherhood services are now substantial, and a major deterrent to use.

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