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Economic & Sector Work :: Poverty Assessment

Mozambique - Beating the Odds: Sustaining Inclusion in a Growing Economy - A Mozambique Poverty, Gender, and Social Assessment, Volume 2. Appendixes

ACCESS TO SERVICES AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS ANIMAL TRACTION BASIC NEEDS BORROWING BREAST MILK CASH CROPS CASUAL WORKERS CC CHANGES IN POVERTY COMMUNITIES COMMUNITY LAND CONSUMPTION PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION QUINTILES COOPERATIVES COPING STRATEGY CRIME CROP INCOME CROP PRODUCTION CROP YIELDS DEPENDENCY RATIO DISABLED DISEASES DIVERSIFICATION DIVORCE DROPOUT DROUGHT EARLY MARRIAGE EARNINGS EDUCATION LEVEL EDUCATION SYSTEM ELDERLY EMPLOYEE EMPLOYER EMPLOYERS ENROLLMENT EXCLUSION EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURES FARM INCOME FEMALE FIREWOOD FIXED CAPITAL FOOD CROPS FOOD POVERTY FOOD PROCESSING FOOD SHARE FORMAL EDUCATION GENDER HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD HEAD OF HOUSEHOLDS HEALTH EXPENDITURE HEALTH SERVICES HOUSEHOLD ASSETS HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION HOUSEHOLD CONSTRAINTS HOUSEHOLD HEAD HOUSEHOLD HEADS HOUSEHOLD INCOME HOUSEHOLD LEVEL HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION HOUSEHOLD POVERTY HOUSEHOLD SIZE HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX ILLNESS IMMUNIZATION INCOME INCOME CATEGORY INCOME GROUP INCOME QUINTILE INCOME SHARES INEQUALITY INSURANCE IRRIGATION LABOR FORCE LATRINE LATRINES LIVE BIRTHS LIVESTOCK INCOME LIVESTOCK SALES MALARIA MARITAL STATUS MEASLES MILK MOSQUITO NET MOSQUITO NETS MOTHER NATURAL DISASTERS NUTRITIONAL STATUS ORPHANS PENSIONS POOR POPULATION DISTRIBUTION POPULATION SHIFT POVERTY DYNAMICS POVERTY GAP POVERTY INCIDENCE POVERTY LEVEL POVERTY LINE POVERTY LINES POVERTY MEASURES POVERTY RATE POVERTY RATES POVERTY REDUCTION POVERTY STATUS PRENATAL CARE PREVENTABLE DISEASES PREVENTION METHODS PRIMARY EDUCATION PRIMARY SCHOOL PROSTITUTION PUBLIC INVESTMENT RADIO REMITTANCES RURAL RURAL AREAS RURAL HOUSEHOLD RURAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME RURAL HOUSEHOLDS RURAL INCOME RURAL INCOME POVERTY RURAL MIGRATION RURAL POPULATION RURAL POVERTY RURAL POVERTY STATUS RURAL URBAN POVERTY RURAL WOMEN SAFE WATER SANITATION SCHOOL ATTENDANCE SCHOOLING SECONDARY EDUCATION SECONDARY SCHOOL SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-EMPLOYMENT SMALLHOLDER SOCIAL GROUP SOCIAL NETWORKS SOURCES OF INCOME SPOUSE TEACHER RATIO TECHNICAL TRAINING TRADITIONAL HEALERS TV URBAN AREAS URBAN WOMEN VEGETABLES VILLAGE VULNERABILITY VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT WAGE EMPLOYMENT WATER USE WELFARE INDICATORS YOUNG GIRLS YOUTH
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Washington, DC
Africa | Mozambique
2012-06-14T18:17:24Z | 2012-06-14T18:17:24Z | 2008-02

This assessment, reflecting poverty's many dimensions in Mozambique, combines multiple disciplines and diagnostic tools to explore poverty. It combines quantitative and qualitative approaches to understand trends in poverty and the dynamics that shape them. The objective is to support the development and implementation of proper policies that really work by taking poverty's multiple dimensions into account. The first analysis is using multiple quantitative and qualitative indicators on levels and changes in the opportunities and outcomes for households and communities in Mozambique since 1997. The main economic developments, analyzes how changes at the macro and meson level affected household livelihoods, and how households, especially poor households, responded. Agriculture and the private sector, especially labor-intensive activities, many of them small and informal. It can build human capital by improving access to basic public services, especially for the poor, and by increasing the value for money in public spending. And it can improve governance and accountability by getting government closer to its citizens. To achieve these goals, the government will need to increase the value for money in its spending on public services. It will also need to target services for the rural poor and enlist poor communities in identifying needs and delivering those services. And it will need to put in place good tracking systems to link program outputs to targets and outcomes, using frequent high-quality household surveys. Mozambique was an extremely poor country at the time of its elections in 1994, with decimated infrastructure, a weak economy, and fragile institutions. Since then, it has been astonishingly successful at restoring growth and improving welfare. Sustained growth -- driven primarily by investments in physical capital -- reduced monetary poverty from 69 percent of the populace in 1997 to 54 percent in 2003 and the depth and severity of no income poverty even more. Broad-based, labor-intensive private-sector growth was efficient in reducing poverty until 2003 because it was equally distributed. At the same time, investments in social and economic infrastructure extended access to public services, reduced welfare inequalities, and supported the livelihoods of the average Mozambican.

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