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Climate Variability and Water Resources in Kenya : The Economic Cost of Inadequate Management

ALGAL BLOOMS ARID AREAS BASIN MANAGEMENT BASINS BILATERAL AGENCIES CANALS CAPACITY BUILDING CATCHMENT CATCHMENT AREA CATCHMENT LEVEL CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT CATCHMENTS CLIMATE VARIABILITY COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION CORAL REEFS COST OF WATER DAMS DECISION MAKING DEMAND FOR WATER DEMAND MANAGEMENT DISCHARGE DROUGHT EROSION EXCESSIVE ABSTRACTION EXPORT FARMERS FERTILIZERS FISHING FLOOD DAMAGE FLOOD MANAGEMENT FLOODING FLOODS FORESTRY GAUGING GAUGING STATIONS GRAZING GROUNDWATER GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT HEAVY METALS INTAKE STRUCTURES IRRIGATION JETTIES LAKES LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION LOGGING MUNICIPAL SEWAGE NATURAL RESOURCES NITROGEN PERMITS PESTICIDES PIPELINES POLLUTION POWER GENERATION PUBLIC HEALTH PUMPING PUMPING STATIONS RAINFALL RAINY SEASONS RECHARGE RESERVOIR SILTATION RESERVOIRS RIPARIAN RIVERS RUNOFF RURAL WATER RURAL WATER SUPPLY SAFE WATER SAFE YIELD SANITATION SANITATION INFRASTRUCTURE SEWAGE TREATMENT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS SHORELINE SMALL DAMS SOIL EROSION STORAGE CAPACITY SURFACE WATER SURFACE WATER RESOURCES TOWNS TOXIC CHEMICALS TRANSBOUNDARY WATERS TRANSPARENCY TREATMENT PLANTS TURBIDITY URBAN AREAS WATER ALLOCATION WATER DEMAND WATER FLOWS WATER LAW WATER MANAGEMENT WATER QUALITY WATER RESOURCE WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WATER RESOURCES WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WATER REUSE WATER SCARCITY WATER SECTOR WATER SOURCES WATER STORAGE WATER SUPPLIES WATER SYSTEMS WATER TABLES WATER TRANSPORT WATER TREATMENT WATER USE WATER USER WATER USERS WATERS WATERWORKS WETLANDS
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Kenya
2012-08-13T15:52:42Z | 2012-08-13T15:52:42Z | 2009-01

Eighty percent of Kenya is arid and semi-arid land; yet despite chronic water scarcity, the country has developed only 15 percent of its available safe water resources. Demand for water is expected to rise, owing to population increases and growing requirements for irrigated agriculture, urban and rural populations, industries, livestock, and hydropower. Meanwhile, climate variability and the steady degradation of water resources cost Kenya at least 3.3 billion Kenyan shillings (Ksh) annually. Between 1997 and 2000, the El Nino-La Nina floods and droughts cost an estimated 290 billion Ksh, or 14 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) for the period. While it is not economical to avoid all costs, many of them can be minimized by increased investments in management and infrastructure, and more efficient, accountable, and participatory management and operation of the water sector.

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