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Economic & Sector Work :: Poverty Assessment

Mozambique - Beating the Odds : Sustaining Inclusion in a Growing Economy - A Mozambique Poverty, Gender, and Social Assessment, Volume 1. Main Report

ACTIVE LABOUR ACTIVE LABOUR MARKET ACTIVE LABOUR MARKET POLICIES ADULT MALES AGE DISTRIBUTION AGE GROUP AGE GROUPS AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT CHILD LABOUR CITY POPULATION CORE LABOR STANDARDS CULTURAL PRACTICES DEVELOPING COUNTRIES EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT EDUCATIONAL DISTRIBUTION EDUCATIONAL LEVEL EMPLOYMENT RATE EMPLOYMENT STATUS EXTENDED FAMILY FAMILY COMPOSITION FAMILY SIZE FEMALE CHILDREN FEMALE EMPLOYMENT FERTILITY FERTILITY RATES GENDER GENDER ROLES GENERAL EDUCATION GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT HIV HOUSEHOLD SIZE ILLITERACY INDUSTRIALIZATION INFORMAL EMPLOYMENT INFORMAL SECTOR INFORMAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT INFORMAL SECTOR WORKERS INFORMATION SYSTEM INTERNAL MIGRATION INTERNATIONAL FOOD POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE JOB CREATION JOB SEARCH JOBS LABOR MARKET LABOUR LABOUR FORCE LABOUR MARKET INFORMATION LABOUR MARKETS LABOUR ORGANIZATION LABOUR SUPPLY LARGE CITIES MANPOWER MARITAL STATUS MIGRANT MIGRANTS MIGRATION STATUS MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS OPEN UNEMPLOYMENT PERCEPTION POLICY IMPLICATIONS POLICY RESEARCH POPULATION DECLINES POPULATION SIZE POVERTY REDUCTION POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY PRIMARY EDUCATION PROGRESS PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYMENT PULL FACTORS REPRODUCTIVE AGE RESPECT RURAL AREAS RURAL PRODUCTIVITY SECONDARY EDUCATION SELF EMPLOYMENT SMALL ENTERPRISES SOCIAL AFFAIRS TOTAL EMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYED UNEMPLOYED YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT DURATION UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR AFRICA URBAN AREAS URBAN EMPLOYMENT URBAN POPULATION URBAN WOMEN URBAN YOUTH VOCATIONAL EDUCATION VOCATIONAL SCHOOL WAGE DATA WAGE EMPLOYMENT WAGES WED YOUNG PEOPLE YOUTH EMPLOYMENT YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT RATES
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Washington, DC
Africa | Mozambique
2012-06-14T14:25:33Z | 2012-06-14T14:25:33Z | 2008-02

This assessment, reflecting poverty's many dimensions in Mozambique, combines multiple disciplines and diagnostic tools to explore poverty. It combines quantitative and qualitative approaches to understand trends in poverty and the dynamics that shape them. The objective is to support the development and implementation of proper policies that really work by taking poverty's multiple dimensions into account. The first analysis is using multiple quantitative and qualitative indicators on levels and changes in the opportunities and outcomes for households and communities in Mozambique since 1997. The main economic developments, analyzes how changes at the macro and meson level affected household livelihoods, and how households, especially poor households, responded. Agriculture and the private sector, especially labor-intensive activities, many of them small and informal. It can build human capital by improving access to basic public services, especially for the poor, and by increasing the value for money in public spending. And it can improve governance and accountability by getting government closer to its citizens. To achieve these goals, the government will need to increase the value for money in its spending on public services. It will also need to target services for the rural poor and enlist poor communities in identifying needs and delivering those services. And it will need to put in place good tracking systems to link program outputs to targets and outcomes, using frequent high-quality household surveys. Mozambique was an extremely poor country at the time of its elections in 1994, with decimated infrastructure, a weak economy, and fragile institutions. Since then, it has been astonishingly successful at restoring growth and improving welfare. Sustained growth -- driven primarily by investments in physical capital -- reduced monetary poverty from 69 percent of the populace in 1997 to 54 percent in 2003 and the depth and severity of no income poverty even more. Broad-based, labor-intensive private-sector growth was efficient in reducing poverty until 2003 because it was equally distributed. At the same time, investments in social and economic infrastructure extended access to public services, reduced welfare inequalities, and supported the livelihoods of the average Mozambican.

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