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Economic & Sector Work :: Policy Note

Lebanon - Social Impact Analysis : Electricity and Water Sectors

ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AFFORDABILITY APPROACH AVAILABILITY BACK UP BACK-UP BACKUP BASIC NEEDS BILL COLLECTION CAPITAL INVESTMENTS COLLECTION DATA COMMERCE COMMODITIES CONNECTED HOUSEHOLDS CONNECTION FEES CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENTS CORRUPTION COST OF ELECTRICITY COST RECOVERY DEBT DEBT SERVICE DEMAND FOR ELECTRICITY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM DRINKING WATER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC REFORM ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY BILL ELECTRICITY BILLS ELECTRICITY COMPANY ELECTRICITY CONSUMERS ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION ELECTRICITY COSTS ELECTRICITY GENERATION ELECTRICITY GENERATORS ELECTRICITY MARKET ELECTRICITY NETWORK ELECTRICITY PAYMENTS ELECTRICITY PRICE ELECTRICITY PRICES ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION ELECTRICITY SECTOR ELECTRICITY SECTOR REFORM ELECTRICITY SERVICE ELECTRICITY SHARE ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ELECTRICITY TARIFF ELECTRICITY TARIFFS ELECTRIFICATION EMPLOYEE END USERS ENERGY DEMAND ENERGY PRICING ENERGY SOURCES ENFORCEMENT MECHANISM EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURES EXTREME POVERTY FAMILIES FINANCIAL BURDEN FINANCIAL COST FISCAL DEFICIT FIXED COST FIXED COSTS FIXED FEE FIXED MONTHLY FEE FIXED TARIFF FUEL FUEL COST FUEL COSTS FUEL PRICES GASOLINE GENERATION GENERATORS GREY ECONOMY HANDICRAFT HEAT HOUSEHOLD CONNECTION HOUSEHOLD CONNECTIONS HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION HOUSEHOLD WELFARE HUMAN RESOURCES INCOME GROUPS INEQUALITY INTERNATIONAL BANK LEGAL FRAMEWORK LIMITED INFRASTRUCTURE LOW-INCOME CONSUMERS LOW-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS MARGINAL COST MENU MUNICIPALITIES NATURAL GAS NETWORK SYSTEM NEW TECHNOLOGY OIL OIL PRICE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS POLICY DESIGN POLLUTION POWER POWER GENERATION POWER GENERATION CAPACITY POWER PLANTS PRIVATE OPERATORS PRIVATE SECTOR PROCUREMENT PROFIT MARGINS PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC FINANCES PUBLIC NETWORK PUBLIC UTILITY PUBLIC WATER QUALITY WATER REGIONAL WATER AUTHORITIES RELIABILITY RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS RESULT RESULTS SAFETY NET SAVINGS SERVICE DELIVERY SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS SERVICE PROVISION SMALL BUSINESS SMALL BUSINESSES SOLAR ENERGY SOLAR WATER HEATING SUPERVISION TARIFF LEVELS TARIFF POLICY TARIFF RATES TARIFF REFORM TARIFF STRUCTURE TECHNICAL STAFF TECHNICAL STANDARDS TELEVISION TOWN TRANSMISSION USES UTILITIES UTILITY MARKET UTILITY SERVICES VOLTAGE VULNERABLE HOUSEHOLDS WATER COMPANIES WATER CONSUMPTION WATER HEATING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE WATER NETWORKS WATER QUALITY WATER RESOURCES WATER SECTOR WATER SERVICE WATER SOURCES WATER SUPPLY WATER SUPPLY SERVICE WATER TARIFFS WELFARE BENEFIT WELLS
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Washington, DC
Middle East and North Africa | Lebanon
2014-07-17T21:48:37Z | 2014-07-17T21:48:37Z | 2009-06-18

The purpose of this Social Impact Analysis (SIA) is to probe the social, poverty, and equity dimensions of electricity and water sector reforms' and provide meaningful analysis to policy makers based on recently collected data. With a focus on households, the end users of utility services, the study complements the recent and ongoing studies on the Lebanon water and energy sectors that deal with more technical and supply side issues. The study assesses how poor and vulnerable households are affected by the current utility service situation and how they may be affected by reform proposals under deliberation. The aim is to provide policy makers with a deeper understanding of the social dimensions of water and electricity consumption as well as tools for estimating the distributional impacts of reform measures. This study followed the Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA) approach, an increasingly common approach, used both within and outside the World Bank to evaluate the distributional impacts of policy reforms. Chapter two provides a review of household electricity supply and demand, private generation, tariffs, expenditures, and willingness to pay. It is followed by a discussion of the distributional impact of the tariff structure, including simulations of tariff scenarios for illustrative purposes. Chapter three reviews the water sector, public water supply, household connections, water quality issues, alternate water sources, tariffs, expenditures, and willingness to pay. Both chapters conclude with recommendations with an emphasis on social implications of key reforms that matters for households. Annexes cover methodology and a description of the private generator business in Lebanon.

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