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Economic & Sector Work :: Public Expenditure Review

Tanzania - Public Expenditure Review of the Water Sector

ABSORPTION CAPACITY ACCESS TO SAFE WATER ACCESS TO SERVICES ACCESS TO WATER ACCESS TO WATER SUPPLY ALTERNATIVE WATER SOURCES AQUIFERS ARID AREAS BASIC SANITATION BASINS BILATERAL AID BOREHOLES CAPACITY BUILDING CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CIVIL SOCIETY CLEAN WATER CLIMATE VARIABILITY COLLECTION SYSTEMS CONSTRUCTION CONSUMPTIVE USE COST RECOVERY COST RECOVERY POLICIES COUNTERPART FUNDING COVERING DAMS DECISION MAKING DRINKING WATER FINANCIAL VIABILITY FLOODS FLUSH TOILET FLUSH TOILETS FRESHWATER FRESHWATER LAKES FRESHWATER RESOURCES GOOD GOVERNANCE GRAVITY GROUNDWATER HAND PUMPS HANDPUMPS HIGH LEVELS HOUSE CONNECTIONS HOUSEHOLDS HYDROPOWER COMPONENT INTER-BASIN TRANSFERS INVESTMENT COST INVESTMENT DECISIONS INVESTMENT FINANCING INVESTMENT PLANNING INVESTMENT PROGRAM INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS INVESTMENTS IN WATER SUPPLY IRRIGATION IRRIGATION PURPOSES LAKE BASINS LAKES LOWER LEVELS OF SERVICE MAINTENANCE COSTS MANAGEMENT OF WATER MANAGING WATER RESOURCES MINING OPERATIONS MONITORING PROCEDURES MONITORING PROGRAM NATIONAL WATER POLICY OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE DATA PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS PIPED WATER PIPELINE PIT LATRINE PIT LATRINES POINT SOURCES POPULATION DENSITIES POPULATION GROWTH POPULATION WITHOUT ACCESS PRESSURE PRIVATE WELLS PROGRAMS PROVISION OF SERVICES PUBLIC COMPANIES PUBLIC WATER QUALITY OF SERVICE QUALITY OF SERVICE DELIVERY QUALITY OF WATER RAIN RIPARIAN RIVER BASIN RIVERS RURAL COMMUNITIES RURAL WATER RURAL WATER SUPPLY RURAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS SAFE WATER SAFE WATER SUPPLY SANITATION COVERAGE SANITATION FACILITIES SANITATION INVESTMENTS SANITATION PERFORMANCE SANITATION SECTOR SANITATION SERVICE SANITATION SERVICE DELIVERY SANITATION SERVICES SERVICE DELIVERY SERVICE PROVIDER SERVICE PROVIDERS SEWERAGE ASSETS SEWERAGE AUTHORITIES SEWERAGE SERVICES SHARED WATERS SPARE PARTS SPRING SPRINGS STORAGE CAPACITY SURFACE WATER SUSTAINABLE WATER TAPS TARIFF POLICIES TARIFF SETTING TOILET FACILITIES TOILETS TOWNS TRANSPARENCY URBAN AREAS URBAN UTILITIES URBAN WATER URBAN WATER SUPPLY URBAN WATER UTILITIES USE OF WATER UTILITY OPERATORS VALUABLE INFORMATION VIP LATRINES WATER AGENCIES WATER ALLOCATION WATER ALLOCATIONS WATER AUTHORITIES WATER AUTHORITY WATER BUDGETS WATER CONNECTIONS WATER DEPARTMENT WATER DISTRICTS WATER INFRASTRUCTURE WATER INVESTMENTS WATER NEEDS WATER PARTNERSHIP WATER POINT WATER POINTS WATER POLICY WATER QUALITY WATER RESOURCE WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WATER RESOURCES WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WATER SECTOR WATER SECTOR DEVELOPMENT WATER SECTOR INVESTMENTS WATER SERVICE WATER SERVICES WATER SOURCE WATER SOURCES WATER STORAGE WATER SUPPLIES WATER SUPPLY WATER SUPPLY ASSETS WATER SUPPLY SERVICE WATER SUPPLY SERVICES WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS WATER SYSTEM WATER TARIFFS WATER USE WATER USERS WATER UTILITY WATER VENDORS WATERS WELLS WETLANDS
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World Bank
Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | East Africa | Tanzania
2012-03-19T17:24:52Z | 2012-03-19T17:24:52Z | 2009-09-01

Improving access to and quality of water supply and sanitation (WSS) services is emerging as a key objective in poverty alleviation. The importance of access to improved water supply and sanitation has been even more pronounced since it was declared a target of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000. The achievement of the MDGs will require a large investment program that will help increase access to safe and sustainable water and sanitation services. The majority of the funds for the sector are still provided for by the government at central, provincial or local levels. Although additional resources may be urgently needed, research in other social sectors (health and education) has also shown that higher public expenditures do not necessarily result in better social outcomes. Gaps in achieving outcomes can be due to: a) sub-optimal spending, due to inefficient allocation of resources, discretionary reallocation of resources, inappropriate policies and institutional incentives, or poor targeting of resources; b) low quality of service delivery due to inefficiencies in service delivery; and c) lack of demand from certain segments of the population. A lot of effort has been dedicated to increasing resources to achieve the MDGs, but the size of the required investments can be substantially reduced if the efficacy, efficiency, and quality of public expenditures in the water and sanitation (WSS) sector can be increased. Looking into the efficiency of public expenditure programs in the WSS sector is complicated. More so than in other social sectors (health and education), the WSS sector is characterized by highly decentralized service delivery that makes data collection more challenging.

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