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Economic & Sector Work :: Energy-Environment Review

Enabling Reforms : A Stakeholder-Based Analysis of the Political Economy of Tanzania’s Charcoal Sector and the Poverty and Social Impacts of Proposed Reforms

ACCOUNTABILITY ALTERNATIVE ENERGY ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCES ALTERNATIVE FUELS ALTERNATIVE MEANS AUTHORITY AUTHORIZATION BIOMASS BIOMASS ENERGY BUREAUCRACY BURNING STOVES CAPACITY BUILDING CARBON CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES CHARCOAL CHARCOAL PRICES CHARCOAL PRODUCTION COALITIONS COMMUNITY GROUPS COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT CONSENSUS CONSUMER PRICES COOK STOVES COOKING CORRUPTION COUNCILS DECENTRALIZATION DECISION MAKERS DECISION MAKING DECISION MAKING POWER DEFORESTATION DEGREE OF INFORMALITY DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPACTS DISTRICTS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC PROCESSES EFFICIENT STOVES ELECTRICITY EMPIRICAL RESEARCH ENERGY DEVELOPMENT ENERGY NEEDS ENERGY PROJECTS ENERGY PROVIDERS ENERGY SECURITY ENERGY SOURCE ENERGY SUPPLY ENERGY USE ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURES FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT FIREWOOD FISCAL INCENTIVES FOOD POLICY RESEARCH FOREST DEGRADATION FOREST MANAGEMENT FORESTRY FUEL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY GOVERNMENT ENTITIES GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS GOVERNMENT LEVEL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS GOVERNMENT POLICIES GOVERNMENT POLICY GOVERNMENT REVENUE GOVERNMENT REVENUES GOVERNMENT STAKEHOLDERS GOVERNMENT SYSTEMS GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION HOUSEHOLD ENERGY HOUSING HUMAN SETTLEMENTS INFORMAL BUSINESS INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS INSTITUTIONALIZATION JUDICIARY KEROSENE LACK OF CLARITY LAND TENURE LAND USE LAND USE PLANNING LAND-USE LEGAL FRAMEWORK LEGAL PROVISIONS LEGISLATION LEGITIMACY LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT LOCAL AUTHORITY LOCAL GOVERNMENT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS MINISTRY OF FINANCE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY NATIONAL LEVEL NATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE NATURAL RESOURCE BASE NATURAL RESOURCES PETROLEUM PETROLEUM GAS POLICY MAKERS POLITICAL ECONOMY POLITICAL MANAGEMENT POLITICIANS PRODUCERS PRODUCTION OF CHARCOAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY PROPERTY RIGHTS PUBLIC GOODS PUBLIC INFORMATION PUBLIC POLICY REGULATORY FRAMEWORK REGULATORY REGIME REPRESENTATIVES REVENUE COLLECTION ROYALTY RURAL AREAS RURAL COMMUNITIES SIDE PAYMENTS SOCIAL IMPACT ANALYSIS SOCIAL NETWORKS SOCIAL WELFARE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT SUSTAINABLE POLICY TAX PAYMENTS TIMBER TRANSACTION COSTS TRANSPARENCY URBAN AREAS URBAN CENTERS URBAN DWELLERS URBAN HOUSEHOLDS VILLAGE GOVERNMENTS VILLAGE LEADERS VILLAGE LEVEL WOOD WOOD FUELS
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World Bank
Africa | Tanzania
2012-03-19T10:23:13Z | 2012-03-19T10:23:13Z | 2010-06-01

Although charcoal is the single most important energy source for millions of urban dwellers in Tanzania, being used by all tiers of society from laborers to politicians, it seems to be politically neglected and even unwanted, given that it is not considered as a possible mean to achieve long-term sustainable development, for example as a low-carbon growth option contributing to energy security, sustainable forest management, and poverty alleviation strategies. The largely unregistered and unregulated production and use of charcoal give reason to serious environmental concerns that call for a comprehensive reform of the sector: with Tanzania's total annual charcoal consumption being estimated at 1 million tons, the annual supply of wood needed to meet this demand is about 30 million cubic meters. Systematic initiatives trying to halt forest degradation and to make the sector more environmentally and economically sustainable are missing or have remained largely ineffective. Building on the World Bank's recent policy note on potential reforms of the charcoal sector in Tanzania, this report aims to facilitate the policy dialogue around charcoal sector reforms by providing analytical information on the political economy of the charcoal sector and on the potential poverty and social impacts of a sustainability-oriented reform agenda. There is no comprehensive policy, strategy, or legal framework in Tanzania addressing the charcoal sector.

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