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Economic & Sector Work :: Country Gender Assessment (CGA)

Gender-Based Differences Among Entrepreneurs and Workers in Lebanon

ABSENCE FROM WORK ABSENTEEISM ACCESS TO BANKING ACCESS TO FINANCE ACCESS TO FINANCING ADVOCACY AGE CATEGORIES AGE CATEGORY AGE COMPOSITION AGE GROUP AGE GROUPS AID APPROVAL RATE BANK LOAN BANKING SYSTEM BANKS BREADWINNERS BREAST BREASTFEEDING BUSINESS ACTIVITIES BUSINESS ACTIVITY BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY BUSINESS OWNERSHIP BUSINESS WOMEN CHILD CARE COLLEGE EDUCATION COLLEGE GRADUATES COMPENSATION CREDIT BUREAUS CULTURAL BARRIERS CULTURAL FACTORS DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS DISAGGREGATED ANALYSIS DISCRIMINATION EARLY CHILDHOOD EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION EARNINGS ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC SITUATION EDUCATION LEVEL EDUCATIONAL LEVEL EDUCATIONAL SECTOR EMPLOYEE EMPLOYER EMPLOYERS EMPLOYMENT HISTORY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN ENDOWMENTS ENROLLMENT ENTREPRENEUR ENTREPRENEURIAL ABILITY ENTREPRENEURIAL INITIATIVE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT ENTRY BARRIERS ENVIRONMENT FOR WOMEN EQUAL FOOTING FAMILIES FAMILY BUSINESS FAMILY BUSINESSES FEMALE FEMALE EDUCATION FEMALE EMPLOYEES FEMALE EMPLOYERS FEMALE EMPLOYMENT FEMALE ENTREPRENEUR FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS FEMALE ENTREPRENEURSHIP FEMALE LABOR FEMALE LABOR FORCE FEMALE LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION FEMALE WORKER FEMALE WORKERS FEMALES FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS FINANCIAL SERVICES FINDING EMPLOYMENT FIRM SURVEY FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENT GENDER GENDER CHARACTERISTICS GENDER DIFFERENCE GENDER DIFFERENCES GENDER DIMENSIONS GENDER DISPARITIES GENDER EQUALITY GENDER GAP GENDER INEQUALITIES GENDER NEUTRAL GENDER SEGREGATION GUARANTEE SCHEMES HEALTH INSURANCE HOME HOUSEHOLD SURVEY HOUSEHOLDS HUMAN CAPITAL ID ILLNESS INCOME EARNING INFORMAL SECTOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT BARRIERS INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES JOB CREATION JOBS JUDGE LABOR FORCE LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION LABOR LAW LABOR LAWS LABOR MARKET LABOR MARKET EXPERIENCES LABOR ORGANIZATION LABOR REGULATION LEGAL STATUS LOAN LOAN GUARANTEE LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAMS LOAN GUARANTEES MALE COUNTERPARTS MALE WORKERS MARITAL STATUS MARRIED WOMEN MATERNITY LEAVE MATERNITY LEAVES MICRO ENTERPRISE MICRO ENTERPRISES MOTHERS OCCUPATION OCCUPATIONS OLDER WOMEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN PARENTAL CARE PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT PERSONAL SAVINGS PREVIOUS WORK PRIVATE COMPANIES PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR FIRMS PRIVATE SECTOR JOBS PROPRIETORSHIP PUBLIC POLICY PUBLIC SECTOR JOBS PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS RESIDUAL CLAIMANT RISK TAKERS RISK-TAKERS SELF EMPLOYED SEX SEX SEGREGATION SEXES SICK LEAVE SICK LEAVES SINGLE WOMEN SKILLED LABOR SMALL BUSINESSES SOCIAL SECURITY SPECIALIST TEMPORARY WORKER TOTAL EMPLOYMENT TOTAL LABOR FORCE UNEMPLOYED UNEMPLOYMENT WAGE DIFFERENTIALS WAGE DISCRIMINATION WAGE GAP WILL WOMAN WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS WOMEN EMPLOYEES WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS WOMEN IN BUSINESS WOMEN WITH CHILDREN WOMEN WORKERS WORKER WORKERS WORKING CONDITIONS YOUNG WOMEN YOUNGER WORKERS
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World Bank
Middle East and North Africa | Lebanon
2012-03-19T17:25:54Z | 2012-03-19T17:25:54Z | 2009-12-07

Lebanon has faced a continuous series of economic setbacks fueled by mounting political uncertainties and war over the decades. The current global financial crisis compounds the levels of uncertainty and anxiety facing households with regards to their future security. The need for earned income and employment is therefore higher than ever and an increasing number of women are entering the labor market as a means of generating additional income for themselves and their families. Women in Lebanon enjoy high social indicators both in education and health. The female to male ratios in secondary and tertiary enrollment are 110 and 116 percent respectively. However, women's participation in the economy whether in the labor market or private sector investment is relatively low, especially when compared to their female counterparts in other similar middle income countries. Female labor force participation in Lebanon is 37 percent compared to 84 percent for men and according to the Lebanese national survey of household living condition (2004), which includes information on 20,000 individuals across Lebanon, female employers account for only one percent of total economically active females compared to almost seven percent of males who are categorized as employers. There are some clear indications that women business owners contribute positively to private sector employment in addition to investment. However, there remain limited availability of in depth information about women entrepreneurs and the dimensions that male and female entrepreneurs play on private sector employment, particularly for women. Chapter one covers the characteristics of female and male entrepreneurs. Chapter two focuses on the workers and their characteristics in terms of age, experience, education, skills, and marital status. Chapter three quantifies the level of the gender gap and identifies its sources in view of the different demographic characteristics of the worker. Finally, chapter four lays down the conclusions, examines the related policy and regulatory environment, and provides recommendations.

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