Skip navigation

Report

Cameroon Economic Update, July 2011, Issue No. 2 : Towards Better Service Delivery

ACCESS TO CREDIT ACCESS TO FINANCE ACCESS TO SERVICES ALLOCATION OF CAPITAL ALLOCATION OF FUNDS ARREARS BAILOUT BENEFICIARIES BIASES BOND BOND ISSUE BOND ISSUES BORROWING BUDGET CONSTRAINT BUDGET PREPARATION BUDGET PROCESS BUDGETARY ALLOCATION BUDGETING CADASTRE CAPACITY BUILDING CAPACITY CONSTRAINTS CAPITA TRANSFERS CAPITAL EXPENDITURE CAPITAL GRANTS CAPITAL MARKET CAPITAL SPENDING CENTRAL BANK CENTRAL BUDGET CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SPENDING CENTRAL TAX CENTRAL TRANSFERS CITIES COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION COMPLIANCE COSTS CONSUMER PRICE INDEX CORPORATE INCOME CORPORATE INCOME TAX COUNTRY DEBT COUPON DEBT MANAGEMENT DEBT OBLIGATIONS DEBT RELIEF DEBT STOCKS DEPOSITS DISTRICTS ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS ECONOMIC GROWTH EFFICIENT USE EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES ENDOWMENTS EQUAL ACCESS EQUALITY EQUIPMENT EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURE DATA EXPENDITURES FINANCIAL CRISIS FINANCIAL MEANS FINANCIAL RESOURCES FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION FISCAL DEFICIT FISCAL DISCIPLINE FISCAL FEDERALISM FISCAL PERFORMANCE FOREIGN INVESTORS GLOBAL ECONOMY GOVERNANCE ISSUES GOVERNMENT BOND GOVERNMENT BONDS GOVERNMENT DEBT GOVERNMENT FINANCING GOVERNMENT SPENDING GOVERNORS GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT HARD BUDGET HARD BUDGET CONSTRAINT HOLDING HUMAN DEVELOPMENT HUMAN RESOURCES INCOME LEVELS INCOME TAX INFLATION INSURANCE ISSUANCE LEGAL FRAMEWORK LENDING AGENCY LEVEL OF TRANSFERS LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT LIQUID SECONDARY MARKET LIQUIDITY LIQUIDITY POSITION LIVING STANDARDS LOCAL ACCOUNTABILITY LOCAL BUDGET LOCAL BUDGETS LOCAL COUNCILS LOCAL DEVELOPMENT LOCAL GOVERNMENT LOCAL GOVERNMENT DEBT LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCING LOCAL GOVERNMENTS LOCAL MARKETS LOCAL OFFICIALS LOCAL OWN-SOURCE LOCAL OWN-SOURCE REVENUES LOCAL POPULATIONS LOCAL PUBLIC SERVICE LOCAL PUBLIC SERVICE DELIVERY LOCAL REVENUE MACROECONOMIC STABILIZATION MAYORS MINISTRY OF ECONOMY MINISTRY OF FINANCE MONETARY FUND MUNICIPALITIES MUNICIPALITY PAYMENT OBLIGATIONS POLICY MAKERS POLITICAL ECONOMY PROPERTY TAX PUBLIC DEBT PUBLIC EXPENDITURES PUBLIC FUNDS PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC INVESTMENT PUBLIC INVESTMENT PROGRAM PUBLIC SERVICES RESERVES REVENUE ASSIGNMENTS REVENUE BASE REVENUE MOBILIZATION REVENUE NEEDS REVENUE SOURCES RISK OF DEBT SERVICE DELIVERY SERVICE PROVISION SHARE OF INVESTMENT STABILIZATION FUNCTION STOCKS SUB-NATIONAL SUB-NATIONAL LIABILITIES SYSTEM OF EQUALIZATION TAX ADMINISTRATION TAX COMMISSION TAX EFFORT TAX RATES TAXATION TAXPAYERS TOTAL EXPENDITURE TOTAL EXPENDITURES TRANSPARENCY TREASURY TREASURY BILLS UTILITIES VALUATION
57
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

Washington, DC
Africa | Cameroon
2017-06-15T14:43:17Z | 2017-06-15T14:43:17Z | 2011-07

These economic updates analyze the trends and constraints in Cameroon's economic development. Each issue, produced bi-annually, provides an update of recent economic developments as well as a special focus on a selected topical issue. The economic updates aim to share knowledge and stimulate debate among those interested in improving the economic management of Cameroon and unleashing its enormous potential. The notes thereby offer another voice on economic issues in Cameroon, and an additional platform for engagement, learning and change. The latest information confirms the expected recovery in economic activity in Cameroon. The upturn in the global economy and measures taken by the authorities to stimulate domestic production, real gross domestic product (GDP) growth in 2010 is estimated to have reached 3.2 percent (compared to 2 percent in 2009). As expected, most of this recovery was driven by the tertiary sector, which accounted for more than half of the estimated growth. The sector benefitted from a pick-up in timber-related transport and continued strong activities in mobile telephony stemming from a greater use of fiber optic, promotional campaigns during the Soccer World Cup, and the roll-out of new products. The recovery in the primary sector, with an estimated growth rate of about 4 percent in 2010, was led by a strong expansion in the timber sector, as well as in food crops. The non-oil secondary sector, meanwhile, is also estimated to have grown by about 4 percent, driven by a continued pick-up in construction activities and a rebound in food processing. Cameroon is a relatively small and mature oil producer, where oil production is declining. Depleting reserves, aging equipment, and more recently postponements of some development projects and investments because of the financial crisis explain this profile. The contribution of this sector to GDP growth has been mostly negative in recent years and oil production is estimated to have contracted by a further 12 percent in 2010 (to 23.2 million barrels).

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period