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Age at First Child Does Education Delay Fertility Timing? The Case of Kenya

ADOLESCENCE ADOLESCENT ADOLESCENT CHILDBEARING ADOLESCENT FERTILITY ADOLESCENT GIRLS ADOLESCENT HEALTH ADOLESCENT MOTHER ADOLESCENT MOTHERS ADOLESCENT PREGNANCY ADOLESCENT REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR ADOLESCENT REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ADOLESCENT REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH POLICY ADOLESCENT SEXUALITY ADOLESCENTS ADULTHOOD AGE AT MARRIAGE AGE AT MENARCHE AGE OF MARRIAGE AGED AUTONOMY OF WOMEN AVERAGE AGE BIRTH COHORT BIRTH WEIGHTS BIRTHS CHILD BEARING CHILD BY AGE CHILD CARE CHILD HEALTH CHILD HEALTH CARE CHILD MORBIDITY CHILD MORTALITY CHILD SURVIVAL CHILDBEARING CHILDBIRTH CLASSROOM CLINICS COMPLETION RATES COMPLICATIONS COMPULSORY SCHOOLING CONTRACEPTION CONTRACEPTIVE METHODS CONTRACEPTIVE USE CONTROL OVER RESOURCES COUNTRIES WITH HIGH FERTILITY RATES CULTURAL CHANGE DECISION MAKING DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DROPOUT EARLY CHILDBEARING EARLY MARRIAGE EARLY PREGNANCIES EARLY PREGNANCY ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC STATUS EDUCATED WOMEN EDUCATION OF WOMEN EDUCATION REFORM EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURES EDUCATIONAL LEVELS EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES EDUCATIONAL POLICIES ENROLLMENT ENROLLMENT RATES ETHNIC GROUP ETHNIC GROUPS EXCESS FERTILITY EXTENDED FAMILY FACT SHEET FAMILY INCOME FAMILY PLANNING FAMILY PLANNING PERSPECTIVES FAMILY SIZE FAMILY TIES FEMALE EDUCATION FEMALE STUDENTS FERTILITY FERTILITY BEHAVIOR FERTILITY LEVELS FERTILITY PATTERNS FERTILITY PREFERENCES FERTILITY RATES FERTILITY REGULATION FERTILITY TRENDS FIRST BIRTH FIRST CHILD FIRST PREGNANCY FIRST SEX FIRST SEXUAL INTERCOURSE GIRLS IN SCHOOL HEALTH CARE HEALTH CONSEQUENCES HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH PROBLEMS HEALTH RISKS HIGH SCHOOL HOUSEHOLD SURVEYS HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IDEAL NUMBER OF CHILDREN IMPACT OF EDUCATION IMPACT ON FERTILITY INFANT INFANT FEEDING INFANT HEALTH INTERVENTION INTERVENTIONS KIDS KINDERGARTEN KINSHIP LARGE FAMILIES LARGER FAMILIES LEVEL OF EDUCATION LEVEL OF FERTILITY LEVELS OF EDUCATION LEVELS OF FERTILITY LITERACY MASS MEDIA MATERNAL EDUCATION MATERNAL MORTALITY MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MINISTRY OF HEALTH MORTALITY MORTALITY RISKS MOTHER NATIONAL COUNCIL NATIONAL LAWS NATIONAL LEVEL NUMBER OF CHILDREN NUMBER OF WOMEN NUTRITION OBSTETRIC CARE OBSTETRIC FISTULA OLD SYSTEM OLDER MOTHERS OLDER STUDENTS PHARMACIES PHYSICAL MATURITY PLACE OF RESIDENCE POLICY LEVER POLICY MAKERS POLICY RESEARCH POLICY RESEARCH WORKING PAPER POOR ADOLESCENT MOTHERS POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT POPULATION BULLETIN POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU POPULATION STUDIES PREGNANCIES OF WOMEN PREGNANCY RATES PREGNANCY-RELATED DEATHS PREGNANT STUDENTS PREGNANT TEENAGERS PREMATURE BIRTH PRIMARY EDUCATION PRIMARY SCHOOL PRIMARY SCHOOL GRADUATES PRIMARY SCHOOLING PRIOR TO MARRIAGE PROGRESS RADIO REPRODUCTIVE AGE REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH INDICATORS REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH POLICY REPRODUCTIVE LIFE RESULT OF PREGNANCY RISK OF DEATH RISK OF EXPOSURE RISK OF PREGNANCY RURAL AREAS SAFE MOTHERHOOD SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SCHOOL CURRICULUM SECONDARY DEGREE SECONDARY EDUCATION SECONDARY SCHOOL SECONDARY SCHOOLING SECONDARY SCHOOLS SELF-RELIANCE SEX SEXUAL INTERCOURSE SIBLINGS SINGLE CHILD SIZE OF FAMILIES SOCIAL CONTROL SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL STATUS SOCIALIZATION SPILLOVER SPOUSES STATUS OF WOMEN TEACHING TEEN TEEN PREGNANCIES TEEN PREGNANCY TEEN YEARS TEENAGE CHILDBEARING TEENAGE FERTILITY TEENAGE MOTHERS TEENAGE PREGNANCIES TEENAGE PREGNANCY TEENAGE WOMEN TEENAGER TEENAGERS TEENS URBAN AREAS VACCINATION WOMAN YOUNG AGE YOUNG MATERNAL AGE YOUNG MOTHERS YOUNG PEOPLE YOUNG WOMAN YOUNG WOMEN
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Africa | Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | East Africa | Kenya
2012-03-19T19:08:39Z | 2012-03-19T19:08:39Z | 2009-02-01

Completing additional years of education necessarily entails spending more time in school. There is naturally a rather mechanical effect of schooling on fertility if women tend not to have children while continuing to attend high school or college, thus delaying the beginning of and shortening their reproductive life. This paper uses data from the Kenyan Demographic and Health Surveys of 1989, 1993, 1998, and 2003 to uncover the impact of staying one more year in school on teenage fertility. To get around the endogeneity issue between schooling and fertility preferences, the analysis uses the 1985 Kenyan education reform as an instrument for years of education. The authors find that adding one more year of education decreases by at least 10 percentage points the probability of giving birth when still a teenager. The probability of having one's first child before age 20, when having at least completed primary education, is about 65 percent; therefore, for this means a reduction of about 15 percent in teenage fertility rates for this group. One additional year of school curbs the probability of becoming a mother each year by 7.3 percent for women who have completed at least primary education, and 5.6 percent for women with at least a secondary degree. These results (robust to a wide array of specifications) are of crucial interest to policy and decision makers who set up health and educational policies. This paper shows that investing in education can have positive spillovers on health.

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