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The Democratic Republic of Congo’s Infrastructure : A Continental Perspective

ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ACCESSIBILITY AIR AIR ROUTES AIR SERVICES AIR TRAFFIC AIR TRANSPORT AIR TRANSPORT SECTOR AIRCRAFT AIRLINE COMPANIES AIRPORTS AMOUNT OF POWER APPROACH AVAILABILITY BANDWIDTH BOTTLENECKS BRIDGE BUDGET EXECUTION CABLE CAPITAL EXPENDITURE CAPITAL SUBSIDIES CAPITALS CARGO CARS CONCESSION CONTAINER PORT CONTAINER TERMINAL CONTAINER TERMINAL OPERATIONS COST OF POWER COST OF POWER PRODUCTION COST RECOVERY COSTS OF POWER CROSSING DEFICITS DIESEL DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER DIRECT CALLS DISTRIBUTION LOSSES DOMESTIC AIR TRANSPORT DOMESTIC FLIGHTS ECONOMIC CONDITIONS ECONOMIC FACTORS ECONOMIC GROWTH ELECTRICITY ELECTRIFICATION EMPLOYMENT EXTENSIVE REHABILITATION EXTERNAL FINANCING FINANCIAL DATA FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FREIGHT GENERATION GENERATION CAPACITY GENERATION OF ELECTRICITY GENERATORS GOVERNMENT SPENDING GRID ELECTRICITY GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT GROWTH RATES HYDRO PLANT HYDROPOWER HYDROPOWER GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS INFRASTRUCTURE POLICY INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING INFRASTRUCTURES INLAND WATERWAYS INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING LINES INVESTMENT PROGRAM INVESTMENT TARGETS INVESTMENTS IN POWER KILOWATT-HOUR LANDLORD MODEL LOCOMOTIVE LOWER PRICES LOWER TARIFFS MAINTENANCE COSTS MAINTENANCE OF INFRASTRUCTURE MARGINAL COSTS MOBILITY NET REVENUES O&M OPEN ACCESS OPERATING COSTS OPERATING EXPENSES PASSENGER TRAVEL POPULATION DENSITY PORT SERVICES POWER POWER CONSUMPTION POWER GENERATION POWER GENERATION CAPACITY POWER PLANT POWER SECTOR POWER SYSTEMS POWER TRADE PRICE OF POWER PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR ACTIVITY PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION PRODUCTIVITY PROFIT MARGIN PUBLIC PUBLIC EXPENDITURE PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE PUBLIC INVESTMENT PUBLIC INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURE PUBLIC INVESTMENTS PUBLIC PRIVATE INFRASTRUCTURE PUBLIC SECTOR RAIL RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE RAIL LINK RAIL NETWORK RAIL NETWORKS RAIL OPERATOR RAIL SERVICE RAIL SYSTEMS RAIL TRAFFIC RAILWAY RAILWAYS REGULATORY FRAMEWORK REVENUE COLLECTION ROAD ROAD DEVELOPMENT ROAD HAULAGE ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE ROAD INVESTMENT ROAD MAINTENANCE ROAD NETWORK ROAD QUALITY ROAD TRAFFIC ROAD TRANSPORT ROADS ROLLING STOCK ROUTE SANITATION SANITATION UTILITIES SAVINGS SPEED LIMITS SURFACE FREIGHT SURFACE TRANSPORT TARIFF LEVELS TAX TAX REVENUES TELECOMMUNICATIONS TELEPHONE CALLS TELEPHONE NETWORKS TRAFFIC DENSITY TRAFFIC LEVELS TRAFFIC VOLUMES TRANSIT TRANSMISSION CAPACITY TRANSMISSION LINE TRANSPORT TRANSPORT CAPACITY TRANSPORT COSTS TRANSPORT INDUSTRY TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE TRANSPORT INVESTMENTS TRANSPORT MODE TRANSPORT NETWORK TRANSPORT POLICY TRANSPORT QUALITY TRANSPORT SAFETY TRANSPORT SERVICES TRANSPORT SYSTEM TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM TRIPS TROPICAL FOREST TRUE URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE URBAN ROAD URBAN TRANSPORT UTILITIES UTILITY BILL UTILITY BILLS VOLTAGE WATER CONSUMPTION WATER SERVICES WATER SUPPLY WATER TARIFFS WATER UTILITIES
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Africa | Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | Central Africa | Congo, Democratic Republic of
2012-03-19T18:01:10Z | 2012-03-19T18:01:10Z | 2011-03-01

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) faces possibly the most daunting infrastructure challenge on the African continent. Conflict has seriously damaged most infrastructure networks. Vast geography, low population density, extensive forestlands, and criss-crossing rivers complicate the development of new networks. Progress has been made since the return of peace in 2003. A privately funded GSM network now provides mobile telephone signals to two-thirds of the population. External funding has been secured to rebuild the country's road network, and domestic air traffic has grown. Modest investments could harness inland waterways for low-cost transport. Much more substantial investments in hydropower would enable the DRC to meet its own energy demands cheaply while exporting vast quantities of power. One of the country's most immediate infrastructure challenges is to reform the national power utility and increase power generation and delivery. Capacity must increase by 35 percent over the period 2006-15 to meet domestic demand. The dilapidated condition of both road and rail infrastructure presents another challenge. To meet the target defined in the report, investment in the country's infrastructure must increase from $700 million to $5.3 billion per year over the next decade, a staggering 75 percent of 2006 GDP. New infrastructure technologies, the elimination of inefficiencies, and cross-border finance (for hydropower development) could cut the annual funding gap in half. Recently, the country secured $4 billion in external finance commitments for infrastructure, enabling increases in budget allocations for public investment.

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