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Zambia Country Program Evaluation FY04-13 : An Independent Evaluation

TARIFFS EMPLOYMENT CAPITAL MARKETS STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT ECONOMIC GROWTH POLICY ENVIRONMENT CARBON DIOXIDE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT CARBON ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS INTEREST AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION EXPECTATIONS PRIVATIZATION INDUSTRY PRODUCERS RESOURCE MANAGEMENT BALANCE OF PAYMENTS STRATEGIES FINANCIAL RESOURCES TIMBER LABOR FORCE SERVICES EMISSIONS POLITICAL ECONOMY REVENUES ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT INCENTIVES PRODUCTIVE RESOURCES PRICING MODELS PROJECTS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT CONDITIONALITY INFLATION AUDITS SAFETY NETS RESOURCE USE BUDGET PRESENT VALUE FISCAL POLICIES EXPLOITATION OIL PRICES ARABLE LAND AIR POLLUTION OIL TRANSPORT POPULATION GROWTH CAPITAL FORMATION PRODUCTIVITY OPTIONS GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT QUOTAS DEBT MARKETS DEFICITS POLLUTION FORESTRY ECONOMIC POLICIES ENTERPRISES NATURAL RESOURCES METALS SUBSIDIES REAL SECTOR FINANCE EFFICIENCY FOOD PRODUCTION INFRASTRUCTURE TAXES LAND USE EFFECTIVE USE GOVERNMENT SECURITIES RESOURCES UNEMPLOYMENT EQUITY SOCIAL SAFETY NETS COPPER SMELTERS RURAL COMMUNITIES ACCOUNTABILITY CAPITAL WAGES CLIMATE CHANGE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT VALUES VALUE POLICY MAKERS BANK STATE ENTERPRISES CREDIT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS PURCHASING POWER DEFORESTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS SUSTAINABLE USE MINES NATIONAL INCOME SUSTAINABLE GROWTH PUBLIC EXPENDITURES ENVIRONMENTS EXPENDITURES PROPERTY DECISION MAKING TAX RATES FISCAL YEAR ENVIRONMENT ECONOMIC SITUATION STREAMS ECONOMICS TERMS OF TRADE SECURITIES PUBLIC DEBT SUBSIDIARY TAX REVENUE GOVERNANCE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CARTELS TRADE LAND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS RISK HEALTH PROBLEMS COMMERCIAL BANKS COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE FARMS AGRICULTURAL SUBSIDIES WATER POLLUTION DECENTRALIZATION INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT REVENUE SULFUR DIOXIDE BORROWING RISK MANAGEMENT LENDING ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROFITS ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNMENTS CIVIL SERVICE WETLANDS FINANCING SOURCES PRICES ECONOMIES AUDITING DEBT RELIEF
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Zambia
2016-03-02T19:58:41Z | 2016-03-02T19:58:41Z | 2015

From 2004 to 2012, Zambia experienced a combination of good economic policies and high rates of growth not seen since the early years after its independence. While growth was mainly driven by rising copper prices, other factors contributed to Zambia’s ability to take advantage of this growth. The international debt relief programs in 2004-2005 almost eliminated public debt and provided the fiscal space for selective, high-priority investments and expanded social programs. The privatization of the copper mines brought new investment in rehabilitation and expansion of production. The period also saw a substantial expansion of primary education and progress in dealing with the most pervasive public health problems. These positive developments set the stage for Zambia to tackle its pervasive poverty. In practice, however, sustained growth over the period has led to little poverty reduction, especially in rural areas of the country. The Bank Group and other donors provided critical support at the beginning of the evaluation period, when Zambia’s debt level became unsustainable. The Bank provided substantial support for capacity development and better functioning institutions. The Bank’s efforts to strengthen public administration and improve governance met with some partial successes in enhanced audit and procurement capacity, and the achievement of Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative compliance. However, despite nearly a decade of implementation, the Integrated Financial Management Information Systems (IFMIS), is still only partially operational. Further, the Zambian government has not followed through on its positive discourse regarding decentralization of government authority.

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