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Power Sector Reform in Africa : Assessing Impact on Poor People

ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ACCESS TO ENERGY BUDGET DEFICITS BULK POWER BULK SUPPLY CENTRAL GOVERNMENT BUDGETS CHARCOAL COAL COMMERCIAL ENERGY CPI CRUDE OIL DEBT DEVELOPED COUNTRIES DIESEL ENGINES ECONOMIC CONDITIONS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMISTS ELECTRIC POWER ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION ELECTRICITY DEMAND ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY ELECTRICITY PRICES ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION ELECTRICITY SECTOR ELECTRICITY SUBSIDIES ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ELECTRICITY SYSTEMS ELECTRICITY UTILITY ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMS END-USE ENERGY ENERGY BALANCE ENERGY DEPARTMENT ENERGY DEVELOPMENT ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY MIX ENERGY POLICY ENERGY PRICING ENERGY SECTOR ENERGY SECTOR MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE ENERGY SECTORS ENERGY SERVICES ENERGY SOURCES ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE EXCHANGE RATE FIREWOOD FISCAL DEFICITS FUEL FUELS GAS RESERVES GENERATION CAPACITY GRID GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT HOUSEHOLD ENERGY INCOME INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE LABOR PRODUCTIVITY LIGHTS LOW- INCOME COUNTRIES LOW- INCOME HOUSEHOLDS LOW-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS MACROECONOMIC STABILITY MARGINAL COST MARGINAL COSTS MONOPOLIES NATURAL GAS PEAK DEMAND PER CAPITA INCOME PETROLEUM PLANNING POPULATION DENSITIES POPULATION GROWTH POWER COMPANY POWER PLANT POWER POOL POWER SECTOR REFORM POWER SECTOR REFORMS POWER SECTORS POWER SUPPLY POWER SYSTEM POWER UTILITIES PRIMARY ENERGY PRIMARY ENERGY CONSUMPTION PRIVATE OWNERSHIP PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION PRODUCTIVITY PUBLIC FINANCE PUBLIC OWNERSHIP PURCHASING POWER RURAL CONSUMERS RURAL HOUSEHOLDS SOCIAL WELFARE SOLAR ENERGY SUSTAINABLE ENERGY TRADITIONAL FUELS TRANSMISSION COSTS TRANSPARENCY UTILITIES
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Africa
2014-04-25T19:07:51Z | 2014-04-25T19:07:51Z | 2005-08

The goal of this study is to examine the impact of power sector reform on poor people in Africa by tracing the relationship between this process and certain key factors that directly affect the poor, such as access to electricity, the affordability of electricity services, quality, and reliability of supply, access to such social services as electrified clinics and schools, economic development, and net impacts on public finances. The study examines power sector reform in six African countries - Ghana, Mali, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda - using sector-wide data. Broad trends across the case study countries suggest that the impacts of power sector reform on the poor are neither direct nor inevitable. Although the introduction of private actors may actually result in price increases and not necessarily expand access to electricity, reform also provides opportunities that would not otherwise exist to improve quality and reliability, expand networks, and re-direct public resources more transparently to the poor and rural communities.

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