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Women and Trade in Africa : Realizing the Potential

ACCESS OF WOMEN ACCESS TO CREDIT ACCESS TO FINANCE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ADVOCACY AGENCIES AGRICULTURAL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS AGRICULTURAL SECTOR AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION BANK BANK ACCOUNT BANK ACCOUNTS BENEFIT BENEFITS BREADWINNERS BRIBE BRIBES BUSINESS ACTIVITIES BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS NETWORKS CAPACITY BUILDING CAPACITY BUILDING FOR WOMEN CASUAL WORKERS CHILDREN COMMUNITY AFFAIRS CORRUPTION CREDIT CROPS DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE DEVELOPMENT BANK DISCRIMINATION DISEASES DIVERSIFICATION DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DOMESTIC WORKERS EARNINGS ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES ECONOMIC BENEFITS ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC POLICY ECONOMIES OF SCALE EDUCATION EDUCATION LEVELS EMPLOYEES EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ENTERPRISE ENTERPRISES ENTREPRENEURS ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY EXPENDITURES EXPLOITATION EXPORT CROP EXTORTION FAMILIES FAMILY FAMILY INCOME FARMER FARMERS FEE FEES FEMALE FEMALE EMPLOYEES FEMALE EMPLOYMENT FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS FEMALE FARMERS FEMALE STAFF FEMALE TRADERS FEMALE WORKERS FISH FOOD PRODUCTS FORMAL BANK FUNDING FUNDS GENDER GENDER AWARENESS GENDER AWARENESS TRAINING GENDER BIAS GENDER DIFFERENCES GENDER DIMENSION GENDER DISPARITIES GENDER EQUALITY GENDER EQUITY GENDER GAP GENDER GAPS GENDER IMBALANCES GENDER INEQUALITIES GROUPS OF WOMEN GROWTH OF WOMEN HEALTH HISTORY HOME HOMES HOUSE HOUSEHOLD HOUSEHOLD CHORES HOUSEHOLDS HOUSES HUSBANDS IMMIGRATION IMPORT DUTIES INCOMES INFORMAL ECONOMY INFORMAL NETWORKS INFORMAL SECTOR INFORMATION ON WOMEN INFORMATION SYSTEM INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INSTALLMENTS INTEGRATION INTERNATIONAL FINANCE JOB CREATION LABOR MARKETS LABOUR OFFICE LABOUR ORGANIZATION LACK OF ACCESS LACK OF KNOWLEDGE LACK OF WOMEN LAND LAWS LEGAL SERVICES LIMITED ACCESS LIVELIHOODS LOANS MARKET INFORMATION MARKETING MINISTRIES OF AGRICULTURE NEEDS OF WOMEN NEW MARKETS NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN OUTREACH PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN PARTNER PARTNERS PAYMENT PAYMENTS PEOPLE PESTS POOR WOMEN PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT PRODUCTION PRODUCTIVITY PROFITABILITY PROPERTY PROPERTY RIGHTS PROPORTION OF WOMEN PUBLIC POLICY RAPE RECEIPT REFUGEES RESEARCH REVENUES ROLE OF WOMEN SAVINGS SECURITY SEXUAL HARASSMENT SEXUAL VIOLENCE SKILLS SMALL BUSINESS SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS SMALL BUSINESSES SMALL FARMERS SOCIAL CLASSES SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL NETWORK SOCIOECONOMIC BACKGROUND SOURCE OF INCOME SOURCES OF CREDIT START-UP START-UP CAPITAL TARIFF TARIFFS TAX CODE TRADE FACILITATION UNEMPLOYMENT UNIFEM UNION UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR WOMEN URBAN AREAS URBAN WOMEN USAID VENTURE CAPITAL VENTURE CAPITAL INVESTMENTS VICTIMS VILLAGE WELFARE WHO WILL WOMEN WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS WOMEN FARMERS WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE WOMEN IN MANAGEMENT WOOD WORKING CAPITAL
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa
Brenton, Paul | Gamberoni, Elisa | Sear, Catherine
2014-01-28T00:53:48Z | 2014-01-28T00:53:48Z | 2013-01

Regional trade in Africa can play a vital role in diversifying economies and reducing dependence on the export of a few mineral products, in delivering food and energy security, in generating jobs for the increasing numbers of young people, and in alleviating poverty and promoting a shared prosperity. Women play a key role in trade in Africa and will be essential to Africa's success in exploiting its trade potential. In many countries in Africa, the majority of small farmers are women, and they produce crops such as maize, cassava, cotton, and rice that have enormous potential for increased trade between African countries and with the global market. Women are also involved in providing services across borders, such as education, health, and professional services, including accountancy and legal services. Hundreds of thousands of women cross borders in Africa every day to deliver goods from areas where they are relatively cheap to areas in which they are in shorter supply. Yet, policy makers typically overlook women's contribution to trade and the challenges they face. This volume brings together a series of chapters that look at the ways that women participate in trade in Africa, the constraints they face, and the impact of those constraints. It seeks to extend the rather small amount of analytical work that has been devoted to this issue and to encourage researchers, especially in Africa, to look more carefully at the specific challenges women face. The chapters look at the conditions and challenges faced by three broad groups: informal cross border traders; women who participate in the production of traded goods and services, ranging from rural farmers of cotton to professional activities such as legal and accountancy services; and women entrepreneurs with dominant ownership of exporting companies. The book highlights the importance of identifying and removing the conditions that prevent women from exploiting the full potential of trading activities. This report is organized as follows: chapter one gives introduction; chapter two presents barriers, risks, and productive potential for small-scale traders in the Great lakes region; chapter three focuses on unshackling women traders: cross-border trade of Eru from Cameroon to Nigeria; chapter four focuses on women cross-border traders, challenges, and behavior change communications; chapter five gives the gender dimension of Uganda's cotton sector; chapter six focuses on services trade and gender; chapter seven focuses on gender in the tourism industry: the case of Kenya; chapter eight presents shape up and ship out?: gender constraints to growth and exporting in South Africa; and chapter nine presents trade and gender in Tanzania: what matters-participation or outcomes?.

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