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Migration and Skills : The Experience of Migrant Workers from Albania, Egypt, Moldova, and Tunisia

ACCESS TO EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION ADULT POPULATION ARCHAEOLOGY ASYLUM ASYLUM POLICY BASIC EDUCATION BRAIN DRAIN CITIZEN CITIZENS CITIZENSHIP CONSEQUENCES OF MIGRATION COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN COUNTRY OF ORIGIN CULTURAL CHANGE CURRENT POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DEVELOPMENT POLICIES DIASPORA DISSEMINATION ECONOMIC GROWTH EDUCATED MEN EDUCATED WOMEN EDUCATION SYSTEMS EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT EMERGENCY SITUATIONS EMIGRANTS EMIGRATION EMIGRATION POLICIES EMPLOYMENT GENERATION ENTREPRENEURSHIP EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES EXPATRIATES FAMILIES FAMILY MEMBERS FAMILY REUNIFICATION FEMALE MIGRANTS FERTILITY FERTILITY RATE FERTILITY RATES FEWER WOMEN FINANCIAL CONSTRAINTS FLOW OF MIGRANTS FORMAL EDUCATION GENDER GENDER BIAS GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS HEALTH CARE HOME COUNTRIES HOST COUNTRIES HOST COUNTRY HOUSEHOLDS HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ILLEGAL MIGRANTS IMMIGRANTS IMMIGRATION IMMIGRATION COUNTRIES IMMIGRATION POLICY IMMIGRATION SYSTEM IMPACT OF MIGRATION INCOME-GENERATING ACTIVITIES INFORMATION DISSEMINATION INFORMATION SYSTEM INSURANCE INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION INTERNATIONAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL TRADE IRREGULAR MIGRATION JOB OPPORTUNITIES LABOR MARKET LABOR MARKETS LABOR MIGRATION LABOR SHORTAGES LAWS LEGAL STATUS LEVEL OF EDUCATION LEVELS OF EDUCATION LIFELONG LEARNING LOCAL COMMUNITY LOCAL DEVELOPMENT LOCAL ECONOMY LONG-TERM RESIDENTS MARITAL STATUS MIGRANT MIGRANT WORKERS MIGRANTS MIGRATION MIGRATION FLOWS MIGRATION FOR EMPLOYMENT MIGRATION ISSUES MIGRATION PATTERNS MIGRATION POLICIES MIGRATION POLICY MIGRATION PROCESS MINORITY MOBILITY MUNICIPALITIES NATIONAL STRATEGY NATIONALS NUMBER OF CHILDREN NUMBER OF PEOPLE PENSIONS POLICIES ON MIGRATION POLICY CHANGE POLICY DEVELOPMENT POLICY DISCUSSIONS POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION POTENTIAL MIGRANTS PUBLIC DEBATE PUSH FACTOR QUALITY OF EDUCATION REFUGEE REMIGRATION REMITTANCES REMITTANCES FROM MIGRANTS RESEARCH TECHNIQUES RETURN MIGRATION RETURN OF MIGRANTS RETURNEES SAVINGS SECONDARY EDUCATION SIGNIFICANT POLICY SKILLED MIGRANTS SKILLED WORKERS SKILLS DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL AFFAIRS SOCIAL CAPITAL SOCIAL CHANGE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL NETWORKS SOCIAL POLICIES SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SECURITY SOCIAL WELFARE SOCIETIES SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS SOCIOLOGY SPOUSE SUBSIDIARY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TEMPORARY MIGRATION TERTIARY EDUCATION TOWNS TRAINING CENTERS TRANSPORT TREATY UNEMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATES VILLAGES VOCATIONAL EDUCATION WAR WOMAN WORK EXPERIENCE WORKFORCE WORKING CONDITIONS YOUNG ADULT YOUNG ADULTS YOUNG PEOPLE
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World Bank
Middle East and North Africa | Europe and Central Asia | Commonwealth of Independent States | North Africa | Southeastern Europe | Egypt, Arab Republic of | Moldova | Albania | Tunisia
2012-03-19T09:33:10Z | 2012-03-19T09:33:10Z | 2010

The subject of migration, and how best to manage it, has been moving up the policy agenda of the European Union for some time now. Faced with an aging population, possible skills shortages at all skills levels, and the need to compete for highly skilled migrants with countries such as Australia, Canada, and the United States, the European Union (EU) is moving from seeing migration as a problem or a threat to viewing it as an opportunity. As an EU agency promoting skills and human capital development in transition and developing countries, the European Training Foundation (ETF) wished to explore the impact of migration on skills development, with a special emphasis on Diasporas and returning migrants. For the World Bank, the issue of migration forms an integral part of its approach to social protection, since it believes that labor-market policy must take into account the national as well the international dimensions of skilled labor mobility. Both institutions were keen to look at what changes need to be made to migration policy in order to achieve a triple-win situation, one that can benefit both sending and receiving countries as well as the migrants themselves. This report aims to unravel the complex relationship between migration and skills development. It paints a precise picture of potential and returning migrants from four very different countries, Albania, the Arab Republic of Egypt, Moldova, and Tunisia, that is a conscious choice of two 'traditional' (Egypt, Tunisia) and two 'new' (Albania, Moldova) sending countries, and describes the skills they possess and the impact that the experience of migration has on their skills development. It is harder to draw accurate conclusions on the link between job aspirations and current employment status, since many of the potential migrants were not actively employed at the time of the interview. However, the data suggest people did expect to change jobs as a result of migration, and the sectors they expected to work in varied according to their nationality. Focusing solely on those planning to move to the EU, many Albanians expected to work in domestic service, hospitality, and construction; Egyptians expected to work in hospitality and construction; Moldovans expected to work in domestic service and construction; and Tunisians expected to work in hospitality and manufacturing. Few migrants working in agriculture or petty trade aimed to work in these same sectors while abroad.

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