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The Health Workforce in Ethiopia : Addressing the Remaining Challenges

ABORTION ABORTION CARE ACCESS TO CARE ACCESS TO EDUCATION ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS TO HEALTH SERVICES AGED ANTENATAL CARE BABIES BASIC HEALTH BASIC HEALTH SERVICES BULLETIN CERTIFICATION CHILD HEALTH CITIES CLINICS COMMUNITY HEALTH COUNTRY OF DESTINATION DEATH RATE DEATHS DECISION MAKING DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DISSEMINATION DOCTORS DRUGS EMERGENCY OBSTETRIC CARE EMPLOYMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY EQUITABLE ACCESS EYE CARE FAMILIES FAMILY PLANNING FEMALE FEMALES GENDER GENERAL PRACTITIONER GENERAL PRACTITIONERS GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT HEALTH CARE HEALTH CARE FACILITIES HEALTH CARE PROVIDER HEALTH CARE SERVICES HEALTH CENTERS HEALTH CENTRE HEALTH EXPENDITURE HEALTH EXPENDITURES HEALTH EXTENSION HEALTH FACILITIES HEALTH INDICATORS HEALTH MANAGEMENT HEALTH MESSAGES HEALTH ORGANIZATION HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH POSTS HEALTH PROFESSIONAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS HEALTH PROVIDERS HEALTH RESULTS HEALTH SECTOR HEALTH SERVICE HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH SYSTEMS HEALTH SYSTEMS STRENGTHENING HEALTH TRAINING HEALTH WORKFORCE HEALTH-SEEKING BEHAVIOR HIV HIV/AIDS HOME VISITS HOSPITAL HOSPITALS HOUSEHOLD INCOME HR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES IMMIGRATION IMMUNIZATION IMMUNODEFICIENCY INCOME INFANT INFANT HEALTH INFANT HEALTH CARE INFORMATION SYSTEM INTERVENTION IRON JOB SECURITY LABOR FORCE LABOR MARKET LABOR MARKETS LABORATORY WORKERS LARGE POPULATION LEGAL STATUS LIVE BIRTHS LIVING CONDITIONS LOCAL COMMUNITY MALARIA MALARIA CASES MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH MATERNAL CARE MATERNAL HEALTH MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES MATERNAL MORTALITY MATERNAL MORTALITY RATIO MATERNAL MORTALITY RATIOS MATERNITY CARE MATERNITY LEAVE MEDICAL CARE MEDICAL DOCTOR MEDICAL DOCTORS MEDICAL EDUCATION MEDICAL SCHOOL MEDICAL SCHOOLS MEDICINE MIDWIFE MIDWIFERY MIDWIVES MIGRANTS MIGRATION MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MINISTRY OF HEALTH MINORITY MORBIDITY MORTALITY MORTALITY RATE MOTHER MOTHERS NEONATAL HEALTH NEONATAL MORTALITY NEWBORN NEWBORN CARE NURSE NURSES NURSING OBSTETRICS PARAMEDICS PATIENT PATIENT SATISFACTION PATIENTS PHARMACIST PHARMACISTS PHARMACY PHYSICIAN PHYSICIANS POLICY DISCUSSIONS POLICY IMPLICATIONS POLICY-MAKING PROCESS POPULATION DATA POSTNATAL CARE POTENTIAL MIGRANTS POTENTIAL USERS PREGNANCY PREGNANT MOTHERS PREMATURE DEATH PREVALENCE PROBABILITY PROGRESS PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH PROVISION PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS PUSH FACTORS QUALITY ASSURANCE RURAL AREAS RURAL COMMUNITIES RURAL RESIDENTS SANITATION SCHOOL CURRICULA SCHOOL HEALTH SCHOOL STUDENTS SECONDARY EDUCATION SECONDARY SCHOOL SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION SEX SEXUAL VIOLENCE SHORT SUPPLY SICK LEAVE SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENCES SPECIALIST SPECIALISTS SURGERY TEACHING HOSPITALS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TETANUS TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES TREATMENT URBAN AREAS URBAN BIAS URBAN POPULATIONS VICTIMS WORKERS WORKING CONDITIONS WORKPLACE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION YOUNG WOMEN
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World Bank
Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | East Africa | Ethiopia
2012-03-19T08:43:52Z | 2012-03-19T08:43:52Z | 2012-01-12

Health indicators in Ethiopia, particularly on child health and malaria, have improved significantly in recent years, with the next challenge now focused on improving maternal health indicators. Improvements in child health and malaria in particular can be attributed to strong government commitment towards health results, reflected in a number of notable policies and programs related to Human Resources for Health (HRH), in particular the health extension worker program. However, indicators related to maternal health remain problematic. Ethiopia has one of the lowest levels of assisted deliveries in the region. Although increases in the number of health workers particularly in rural areas may have contributed to improving access to some health services, it is in the government's interest to further improve the stock, distribution, and performance of relevant health workers in Ethiopia, particularly to bring about improvement in access to maternal health services for the poor. This document reviews the current HRH situation in Ethiopia, summarizes the evidence on population use of select health services, and offers relevant policy options to assist the government finalize its new human resources strategy and address remaining health challenges.

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