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Health Equity and Financial Protection in Zambia

ABILITY TO PAY ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION AGED ANGINA ANGINA PECTORIS ANTENATAL CARE ARI ARTHRITIS ASTHMA BASIC HEALTH BASIC HEALTH CARE BCG BIRTHS BLOOD TESTS BREAST BREAST CANCER CATASTROPHIC EXPENDITURE CERVICAL CANCER CHILD HEALTH CHILDHOOD CHILDHOOD ILLNESS CLINICS CONDOM CONDOMS CONTRACEPTION COST-EFFECTIVENESS COUGHING COUNSELING DEATHS DELIVERY OF HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEM DEPRESSION DIABETES DIARRHEA DISEASE DISEASE BURDEN DOCTOR DOCTORS EMPLOYMENT FEE SCHEDULES FEVER FINANCIAL CONSEQUENCES FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FINANCIAL IMPACT FINANCIAL PROTECTION HEALTH BEHAVIOR HEALTH CARE HEALTH CARE DELIVERY HEALTH CARE FINANCE HEALTH CARE FINANCING HEALTH CARE PROVIDER HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS HEALTH CARE SERVICES HEALTH CARE UTILIZATION HEALTH CENTERS HEALTH COMMITTEES HEALTH ECONOMICS HEALTH EQUITY HEALTH EXPENDITURE HEALTH EXPENDITURES HEALTH FACILITIES HEALTH FINANCE HEALTH FINANCING HEALTH FINANCING SYSTEM HEALTH INDICATORS HEALTH INSURANCE HEALTH INSURANCE CONTRIBUTIONS HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE HEALTH INSURANCE SCHEME HEALTH INSURANCE SYSTEM HEALTH INTERVENTIONS HEALTH MANAGEMENT HEALTH ORGANIZATION HEALTH OUTCOME INDICATORS HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH POLICIES HEALTH POSTS HEALTH REFORMS HEALTH SECTOR HEALTH SERVICE HEALTH SERVICE DELIVERY HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH SPENDING HEALTH SPENDING INCREASES HEALTH STATUS HEALTH SURVEILLANCE HEALTH SURVEYS HEALTH SYSTEM HEALTH SYSTEMS HEALTH WORKERS HIV HIV POSITIVE HIV/AIDS HOSPITAL BEDS HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT HOSPITALS HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE HUMAN RESOURCES ILLNESS IMMUNIZATION INCIDENCE ANALYSIS INCOME INCOME COUNTRIES INCOME GROUPS INEQUALITIES IN HEALTH CARE INFANT MORTALITY INFANT MORTALITY RATE INJURY INPATIENT CARE INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS LIVING CONDITIONS LIVING STANDARDS LOW INCOME MALARIA MAMMOGRAM MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH MEASLES MEDICAL CARE MEDICAL STAFF MEDICAL TREATMENT MIDWIFE MORTALITY MORTALITY RATES MOSQUITO NET MOTHERS NATIONAL HEALTH NATIONAL HEALTH POLICIES NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICES NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS NURSE NUTRITION OBESITY ORAL REHYDRATION ORAL REHYDRATION SALTS OUTPATIENT CARE PAP SMEAR PAYMENTS FOR HEALTH CARE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PHYSICIANS POCKET PAYMENTS POISONING POLIO PREGNANT WOMEN PREPAYMENT SCHEMES PREVALENCE PRIMARY CARE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SERVICES PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE PRIVATE INSURANCE PRIVATE SECTOR PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC HOSPITALS PUBLIC SECTOR RISK FACTORS SCREENING SEXUAL INTERCOURSE SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS SHARE OF HEALTH SPENDING SMOKING SOCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE SOCIAL INSURANCE SOCIAL SECURITY SPECIALISTS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SYMPTOMS TB TOBACCO PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY VIOLENCE WORKERS
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Washington, DC
Africa | Zambia
2017-06-14T22:25:49Z | 2017-06-14T22:25:49Z | 2012-05-21

This report analyzes equity and financial protection in the health sector of Zambia. In particular, it examines inequalities in health outcomes, health behavior and health care utilization; benefit incidence analysis; financial protection; and the progressivity of health care financing. Data are drawn from the 2007 Zambia demographic and health survey, the 2006 Zambia living conditions monitoring survey, the 2003 Zambia world health survey and the 2003 Zambia national health accounts. All analyses are conducted using original survey data and employ the health modules of the ADePT software. Overall, health care financing in Zambia in 2006 was fairly progressive, i.e. the better-off spent a larger fraction of their consumption on health care than the poor. The financing sources that contribute to the overall progressivity of health care finance are general taxation, which finances 42 per cent of domestic spending on health, and contributions made by private employers, which finance 9 per cent of spending. An additional contribution to overall progressivity is made through pre-payment mechanisms, but this remains fairly limited given that they only represent 1 per cent of total health finance. Out-of-pocket health payments, which account for 47 per cent of total health financing, appear to be proportional to income, with only slight and not statistically significant evidence of progressivity.

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