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Economic & Sector Work :: Foreign Trade, FDI, and Capital Flows Study

Estimating Trade Flows, Describing Trade Relationships, and Identifying Barriers to Cross-Border Trade Between Cameroon and Nigeria

ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACCESSIBILITY AGRICULTURAL OUTPUT AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS AGRICULTURE ARBITRAGE AUTOMOBILE AVERAGE PRODUCTION COSTS BARRIERS TO TRADE BENCHMARKING BICYCLES BILATERAL AGREEMENT BILATERAL TRADE BORDER CROSSING BORDER CROSSINGS BUS CARS CASE-BY-CASE BASIS CLIMATIC CONDITIONS COLLUSION COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE COMPETITIVENESS CONSUMERS COUNTERVAILING POWER CROSS-BORDER TRADE CROSS-BORDER TRANSACTIONS CUSTOMS CUSTOMS BROKERS CUSTOMS CLEARANCE CUSTOMS DUTIES CUSTOMS OFFICERS CUSTOMS OFFICES CUSTOMS OFFICIALS CUSTOMS OFFICIALS CLAIM CUSTOMS PROCEDURES CUSTOMS VALUATION DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES DOMESTIC PRICE DOMESTIC SUBSIDIES DOMESTIC TRADE DOMESTIC TRANSPORT DRIVERS ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC FACTORS ECONOMIC GROUPINGS ECONOMIC INTEGRATION ECONOMIC OUTCOMES ECONOMIES OF SCALE ELECTRICITY GENERATION ENFORCEMENT MECHANISMS EXCHANGE RATE EXPORT BANS EXPORT RESTRICTIONS EXPORTS EXTERNAL TARIFF FISH FLOW OF TRAFFIC FREE MOVEMENT OF GOODS FREE TRADE FREE TRADE AREA FREE TRADE ZONE FREIGHT FREIGHT FORWARDERS FUEL GASOLINE GROSS MARGIN HIGH TRANSPORT HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT HIGHWAY HIGHWAY PATROL IMPORT BANS IMPORT DATA IMPORT PROCEDURES IMPORT PROHIBITION IMPORT STATISTICS IMPORT TAX IMPORTS INCOME INCOME LEVELS INSPECTION INTEGRATION PROCESSES INTERMEDIATE INPUTS INTERNAL TRADE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY INTERNATIONAL MARKETS INTERNATIONAL TRADE INVESTMENT IN ROADS LEGAL RIGHTS LOBBYING MARKET ACCESS MARKET PRICES NATIONAL TRANSPORT NATURAL RESOURCE BASE NON-TARIFF BARRIERS OIL OUTSOURCING OVERVALUATION PASSENGERS PERSONAL VEHICLES PETROLEUM PRODUCTS POLICE POLICY MAKERS POLITICAL ECONOMY POPULATION DENSITY PREFERENTIAL TRADE PREFERENTIAL TRADE AGREEMENT PRICE DIFFERENCES PRODUCERS PRODUCTION COSTS PROFIT MARGIN PROFIT MARGINS PROTECTIONISM PROTECTIONIST QUALITY STANDARDS QUANTITATIVE RESTRICTIONS REAL INCOME REGIONAL INTEGRATION REGIONAL LEVEL REGIONAL TRADE ROAD ROAD CONDITIONS ROAD IMPROVEMENTS ROAD USERS ROUTE ROUTES RULE OF LAW RULES OF ORIGIN SAFETY SHOPS TARIFF RATES TARIFF STRUCTURE TAX TIMBER TRADE FLOWS TRADE INTEGRATION TRADE LIBERALIZATION TRADE PATTERNS TRADE POLICIES TRADE POLICY TRADE POLICY ENVIRONMENT TRADE POLICY REVIEW TRADE PROTECTION TRADE REGIME TRADE RELATIONSHIP TRADE RELATIONSHIPS TRADE TAXES TRAFFIC TRANSACTION COSTS TRANSACTIONS COSTS TRANSIT TRANSIT TRADE TRANSPARENCY TRANSPORT ACTIVITY TRANSPORT CORRIDORS TRANSPORT COSTS TRANSPORT FACILITATION TRANSPORT POLICIES TRANSPORT SERVICE TRANSPORT SERVICE PROVIDERS TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION COSTS TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE TRANSPORTS TRAVEL TIME TRIP TRIPS TRUCKS UNEMPLOYMENT VEHICLE WEATHER PATTERNS WORLD MARKET WORLD TRADE WORLD TRADE ORGANISATION WTO
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Washington, DC
Africa | Cameroon
2014-01-08T22:37:06Z | 2014-01-08T22:37:06Z | 2013-05-07

Cameroon and Nigeria share a common border of nearly 1,700km and both countries have strong historical and cultural ties. However, the partnership between the two countries has had its difficult periods, most recently when the relationship turned hostile over the disputed Bakassi Peninsula, and economic linkages between the economies remain limited. Expanding trade between the two countries could play a critical role in accelerating economic development and regional integration by opening up new markets for producers, and allowing them to benefit from economies of scale. This will require reducing barriers to cross-border trade, allowing increased trade flows to reach the larger market, and permitting private sector producers to increase the scale of their activities. Removing barriers to trade between the two neighbors is likely to benefit particularly relatively remote areas of both countries. The study finds that regulatory and security barriers at the border and along the road remain key impediments to trade. The remainder of this report proceeds as follows. Section one describes drivers for cross border trade such as historical relations, economic factors, and the policy environment. The next section describes the reality of trade flows by describing existing trade corridors and estimating current trade flows. Section three describes how goods are actually traded across borders between the two countries, and how different actors are involved. Section four describes the barriers to trade, and identifies which barriers are most important. Section five describes the potential for increasing trade. Section six summarizes the findings and presents prioritized recommendations for policy reform.

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