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Economic & Sector Work :: Other Social Protection Study

Kenya Social Protection Sector Review : Executive Report

ACCOUNTABILITY MECHANISMS ADMINISTRATIVE OVERHEADS AGRICULTURAL INPUTS ARID LANDS ASSET MANAGEMENT BANK BRANCH BANKING NETWORK BANKS BENEFICIARIES BENEFICIARY BENEFICIARY HOUSEHOLDS BENEFIT LEVELS CAPACITY BUILDING CAPITAL INVESTMENT CASH BENEFITS CASH INCOME CASH PAYMENTS CASH TRANSFER CASH TRANSFERS CHILD LABOUR CHILD NUTRITION CHRONIC FOOD INSECURITY CHRONIC POVERTY CHRONICALLY POOR COPING MECHANISMS COPING STRATEGIES CORRUPTION CREDITS DECLINE IN POVERTY DEGREE OF FRAGMENTATION DISABILITY GRANTS DISABLED DROUGHT ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIES OF SCALE EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE EMERGENCY FOOD EMERGENCY RESPONSE EMERGENCY SITUATIONS EMPLOYER ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT ENTREPRENEURIAL ACTIVITY EQUAL AMOUNT EXCLUSION EXPENDITURE EXPENDITURES FAMILIES FARMER FARMERS FEMALE WORKERS FINANCIAL SUPPORT FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY FLOW OF FUNDS FOOD AID FOOD DISTRIBUTION FOOD INSECURITY FOOD RELIEF FOOD SUBSIDY GENDER HEALTH CARE FINANCING HEALTH INSURANCE HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH SPENDING HEALTH VOUCHER HOUSEHOLD BUDGET HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION HOUSEHOLD INCOME HOUSEHOLD SIZE HOUSEHOLD WELFARE HOUSEHOLDS HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT HUMANITARIAN RELIEF INCOME INCOME SECURITY INEQUALITY INFORMAL WORKERS INFORMATION SYSTEM INFORMATION SYSTEMS INSURANCE INSURANCE PREMIUMS INSURANCE SCHEMES JOB CREATION KEY CHALLENGES LABOUR MINISTRY LIMITED CAPACITY LOC LOSS OF INCOME MALNUTRITION MARKET PRICES MATERNITY BENEFITS MEANS TEST MEANS TESTS MEAT MEDICAL SERVICES MERCHANTS MICRO ENTERPRISES MICRO-FINANCE NATIONAL COVERAGE NATIONAL HOSPITAL OLD AGE OUTREACH OVERHEAD COSTS PENSION PENSION FUND PENSIONS PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES POINT OF SALE POOR POOR AREAS POOR COUNTIES POOR FARMERS POOR HOUSEHOLDS POOR INFRASTRUCTURE POOR PEOPLE POOR POPULATION POOR POPULATIONS POOR WOMEN POVERTY GAP POVERTY RATES POVERTY REDUCTION POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGIES PRODUCTIVE ASSETS PROTECTION POLICY PUBLIC RESOURCES PUBLIC WORKS REGISTRATION SYSTEM REGISTRATION SYSTEMS RESPONSE TO CRISES RURAL RURAL AREAS SAFETY NET SAFETY NET SYSTEM SAFETY NETS SANITATION SAVINGS SCHOOL FEEDING SCHOOL MEALS SERVICE PROVIDERS SHOCK SKILLS TRAINING SMART CARD SOCIAL ASSISTANCE SOCIAL COMMITMENT SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL INSURANCE SOCIAL POLICY SOCIAL PROTECTION SOCIAL PROTECTION SPENDING SOCIAL SECURITY SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING TARGETING UNEMPLOYMENT UNION UNIVERSAL ACCESS URBAN AREAS VULNERABILITY TO POVERTY VULNERABLE CHILDREN VULNERABLE GROUP VULNERABLE GROUPS VULNERABLE MEMBERS VULNERABLE PEOPLE VULNERABLE POPULATIONS WAGE EMPLOYMENT
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Nairobi
Africa | Kenya
2014-02-10T21:09:43Z | 2014-02-10T21:09:43Z | 2012-06

There is now broad consensus among policymakers that social protection is a powerful way to fight poverty and promote inclusive growth. This international consensus is most clearly articulated in the African Union's Social Policy Framework (SPF), which was endorsed by all African heads of state in 2009. The SPF explains that social protection includes 'social security measures and furthering income security; and also the pursuit of an integrated policy approach that has a strong developmental focus, such as job creation' the SPF commits governments to progressively realizing a minimum package of essential social protection that covers essential health care and benefits for children, informal workers, the unemployed, the elderly, and people with disabilities. Kenya has a long history of investing in social protection. Social protection in Kenya is defined as 'policies and actions, including legislative measures, that enhance the capacity of and opportunities for the poor and vulnerable to improve and sustain their lives, livelihoods, and welfare, that enable income-earners and their dependents to maintain a reasonable level of income through decent work, and that ensure access to affordable healthcare, social security, and social assistance.' However, the coverage of its social insurance schemes and safety net programs has tended to be low and their effectiveness limited. In 2005/06 the rate of poverty was 47 percent, although poverty rates were markedly higher in rural areas (50 percent) than in urban areas (34 percent). They also varied among provinces from a high of 74 percent in the North Eastern province to a low of 22 percent in Nairobi. This persistent poverty highlights the fact that social protection can play an important role in the effort to reduce poverty and promote human development in Kenya.

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