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Challenges and Opportunities of Mobile Phone-Based Data Collection : Evidence from South Sudan

ACCESS TO SERVICES BLOG CALL CENTER CELL PHONE CELLULAR NETWORKS CHANGE CIVIL SOCIETY COLLABORATION COMMODITIES COMMODITY COMMUNICATION SERVICE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES COMPETITIVE MARKETPLACE COMPUTERS CONNECTIVITY CONSULTATION CONSUMERS CORRUPTION DATA COLLECTION DATA COMMUNICATIONS DATA ENTRY DATA TRANSFER DECISION MAKING DIAL TONES DIGITAL MONEY DISCUSSIONS ELECTRICITY ELECTRONIC DEVICE ELECTRONIC FORM ELECTRONIC FORMS ELECTRONIC MEDIA ENUMERATORS EQUIPMENT EXCHANGE RATE FEASIBILITY FEMALE FIGURES GENDER HOMES HOUSEHOLDS HOUSING ID IDENTITY MODULE IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD INSTALLATION INTERFACE INTERFACES INTERVIEWING INTERVIEWS LITERACY LIVING CONDITIONS LOCAL GOVERNMENT MARKET INFORMATION MARKETING MATERIAL MEDICINE MENU MISSING VALUES MOBILE APPLICATIONS MOBILE DEVICE MOBILE NETWORK MOBILE PHONE MOBILE PHONES MOBILE SERVICE MOBILE TELEPHONY MOBILE TRANSACTIONS MOBILE USER MOBILE USERS NAVIGATION OPEN ACCESS OPINION PACKET RADIO PACKET RADIO SERVICE PARTICIPATION RATES PERCEPTIONS PHONE NUMBERS POSTAL SERVICE POVERTY REDUCTION PROCUREMENT PROTOCOL QUESTIONNAIRE QUESTIONNAIRES RADIO RECONSTRUCTION RELIABILITY RELIABLE ACCESS RESPONSE RATES RESULT RESULTS RURAL AREAS SAMPLE SELECTION SAMPLE SIZE SERVER SERVICE PROVIDER SERVICE PROVIDERS SOCIOECONOMIC DATA SOCIOECONOMIC SURVEYS SOFTWARE PROGRAMS SURVEY DATA SURVEY IMPLEMENTATION SURVEY METHODOLOGY SURVEY QUESTIONS SURVEY RESULTS TECHNICAL STANDARD TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES TELEVISION TELEVISIONS TIME SERIES TOWNS TRANSMISSION URBAN AREAS URBAN POPULATION USER USERS WEB WIRELESS APPLICATION PROTOCOL WIRELESS COMMUNICATION
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa
2013-01-28T19:28:16Z | 2013-01-28T19:28:16Z | 2013-01

The proliferation of mobile phones in developing countries has generated a wave of interest in collecting high-frequency socioeconomic surveys using this technology. This paper considers lessons from one such survey effort in a difficult environment -- the South Sudan Experimental Phone Survey, which gathered data on living conditions, access to services, and citizen attitudes via monthly interviews by phones provided to respondents. Non-response, particularly in later rounds of the survey, was a substantial problem, largely due to erratic functioning of the mobile network. However, selection due to non-response does not appear to have markedly affected survey results. Response rates were much higher for respondents who owned their own phones. Both compensation provided to respondents in the form of airtime and the type of phone (solar-charged or traditional) were varied experimentally. The type of phone was uncorrelated with response rates and, contrary to expectation, attrition was slightly higher for those receiving the higher level of compensation. The South Sudan Experimental Phone Survey experience suggests that mobile phones can be a viable means of data collection for some purposes, that calling people on their own phones is preferred to handing out phones, and that careful attention should be given to the potential for selective non-response.

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