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Cash Transfers and Child Schooling : Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation of the Role of Conditionality

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT ACADEMIC YEAR ACCOUNT ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT TESTS ADOLESCENT GIRLS AGE GROUPS ATTENDANCE RATE ATTENDANCE RATES CHILD DEVELOPMENT CHILD EDUCATION CHILD FOSTERING CHILD LABOR CHILDREN START SCHOOL CHILDREN UNDER AGE COGNITIVE ABILITY COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT CONDITIONING CONTROL GROUPS DROP-OUTS DROPOUT RATES EDUCATION OUTCOMES EDUCATION POLICY EDUCATION SPECIALISTS EDUCATION SYSTEM EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES ENROLLMENT ENROLLMENT DATA ENROLLMENT FOR CHILDREN ENROLLMENT INCREASES ENROLLMENT OF CHILDREN ENROLLMENT RATE ENROLLMENT RATES FINAL GRADE FINAL GRADES FORMAL SCHOOLING GENDER GENDER DIFFERENCE GENDER GAP GENDER GAP IN EDUCATION GIRLS GRADE REPETITION HEALTH INTERVENTIONS HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INTELLIGENCE INTERVENTIONS LEARNING LEARNING OUTCOMES LEVEL OF EDUCATION LIVING CONDITIONS NET ATTENDANCE RATIO NUTRITION OFFICIAL SCHOOL AGE OLDER CHILDREN PERSONALITY PERSONALITY TRAITS PRIMARY SCHOOL PRIMARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT PRIMARY SCHOOL STUDENTS PRIMARY SCHOOLING PRIMARY SCHOOLS PRIMARY-SCHOOL PRIMARY-SCHOOL-AGE PRIMARY-SCHOOL-AGE POPULATION PROBLEM SOLVING PSYCHOLOGY RADIO READING RECOGNITION RETURNS TO EDUCATION RURAL AREAS RURAL CHILDREN SCHOOL ATTENDANCE SCHOOL CHILDREN SCHOOL DATA SCHOOL DAY SCHOOL DAYS SCHOOL FEES SCHOOL GOING SCHOOL MEALS SCHOOL PARTICIPATION SCHOOL QUALITY SCHOOL TEACHERS SCHOOL YEAR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN SCHOOL-AGE POPULATION SCHOOLING SCHOOLS SECONDARY SCHOOL SECONDARY SCHOOLS SOCIAL PROTECTION SOCIAL SAFETY TEACHER TEACHERS TEACHING TEACHING MATERIALS TEXTBOOK VILLAGE LEVEL YOUNG BOYS YOUNG CHILDREN YOUNG GIRLS YOUNGER CHILDREN
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Burkina Faso
2013-04-10T18:29:28Z | 2013-04-10T18:29:28Z | 2013-01

The authors conduct a randomized experiment in rural Burkina Faso to estimate the impact of alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms on education. The two-year pilot program randomly distributed cash transfers that were either conditional or unconditional. Families under the conditional schemes were required to have their children ages 7-15 enrolled in school and attending classes regularly. There were no such requirements under the unconditional programs. The results indicate that unconditional and conditional cash transfer programs have a similar impact increasing the enrollment of children who are traditionally favored by parents for school participation, including boys, older children, and higher ability children. However, the conditional transfers are significantly more effective than the unconditional transfers in improving the enrollment of "marginal children" who are initially less likely to go to school, such as girls, younger children, and lower ability children. Thus, conditionality plays a critical role in benefiting children who are less likely to receive investments from their parents.

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