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Republic of Niger : Trends of Poverty, Inequality, and Growth, 2005-2011

HOUSEHOLD INCOMES LIVING STANDARDS PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION GROWTH RATES ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES RISKS HOUSEHOLD SIZE CAPITA INCOME POVERTY LINE IMPACT ON POVERTY ECONOMIC GROWTH HUMANITARIAN AID INEQUALITY DYNAMICS NATIONAL ACCOUNTS SQUARED POVERTY GAP GROWTH ELASTICITY INCOME POVERTY INCOME URBAN POVERTY AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION POVERTY RATES ANNUAL GROWTH RATE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION CONSUMER GOODS CONSUMPTION DATA DROUGHT YEARS HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION HEALTH CARE RURAL INCOMES PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE NATIONAL POVERTY POOR PEOPLE ANNUAL GROWTH NATIONAL POVERTY RATE DEVELOPMENT GOALS RURAL POVERTY RATE RURAL POPULATION AGRICULTURAL OUTPUT MEASURES ANTIPOVERTY POLICIES WELFARE INDICATOR REGION MATERNAL MORTALITY POVERTY REDUCTION ECONOMIC ACTIVITY AVERAGE GROWTH RATE PUBLIC POLICY PRO-POOR MEASURING POVERTY PER CAPITA INCOME RURAL HOUSEHOLDS NEGATIVE IMPACT POVERTY GAP INCOME GROWTH PERSISTENT POVERTY GINI INDEX POVERTY INCIDENCE POOR RURAL HOUSEHOLDS HOUSEHOLD SURVEYS FARMERS OUTPUT GROWTH POVERTY HEADCOUNT RATE AVERAGE GROWTH AGRICULTURAL SHOCKS CONSUMPTION POVERTY DATA HUMAN CAPITAL REDUCING POVERTY FARMLAND RURAL COMMUNITIES FOOD SECURITY LIVESTOCK SECTOR RURAL COUNTERPARTS UPPER INCOME GROUPS SUSTAINABLE POVERTY DROUGHT POOR POLICY RURAL SECTOR REDUCTION IN POVERTY POVERTY MEASUREMENT PUBLIC POLICIES REMOTE RURAL AREAS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE RURAL POVERTY INCOME DISTRIBUTION URBAN AREAS AGRICULTURAL SECTOR RURAL ECONOMY SMALLHOLDER FARMERS RURAL RURAL WORKERS TRANSACTION COSTS DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS DIVERSIFICATION CHILD MORTALITY POVERTY INDICATORS ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES POOR POPULATION GROWTH RATE EXTREME POVERTY IRRIGATION HIGH POVERTY RURAL AREAS POVERTY HEADCOUNT POVERTY HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION EMPLOYMENT DYNAMICS HEALTH BUDGET SUSTAINABLE POVERTY REDUCTION DECLINE IN POVERTY POVERTY DYNAMICS RAPID GROWTH HIGH GROWTH POVERTY RATE POOR WELFARE IMPROVEMENTS CONSUMPTION PER CAPITA FOOD PRICES ECONOMIC SHOCKS RURAL DEVELOPMENT LONG RUN DROP IN POVERTY INCOME GROUPS INEQUALITY GROWTH POOR HOUSEHOLDS
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Washington, DC
Africa | Niger
2015-11-03T19:28:06Z | 2015-11-03T19:28:06Z | 2014-08

The ability to accurately monitor poverty trends is crucial to ensure the adoption of effective antipoverty policies and to assess progress toward the achievement of national development goals. In Niger, efforts to assess poverty dynamics between 2005 and 2011 are complicated by methodological differences in the three household surveys conducted over the period, in 2005, 2007-08 and 2011. While Niger’s overall poverty rate has dropped significantly between 2005 and 2011, changes in the poverty incidence are highly uneven across location types. Among the major causes of persistent poverty are the country’s minimal economic diversification and extremely limited agricultural infrastructure, which leave the majority of Nigerien households dependent on highly vulnerable farming and livestock production. In addition, the country’s extremely high rate of population growth presents a serious obstacle to sustainable poverty reduction. Not only does Niger have one of the highest population growth rates in the world, but fertility correlates inversely with income level. In other words, the fastest-growing segments of the population are also the poorest, and as a result, the declining trend in the national poverty rate is continuously offset by a steady increase in the absolute number of Nigeriens living in poverty. In addition, the relationship between population growth and rural-urban migration has important implications for poverty trends. Urban fertility rates are lower than rural rates and have been declining over time, while rural fertility rates remain both extremely high and relatively stable. Over the long run urbanization may have the added benefit of slowing nationwide population growth. However, this dynamic will be greatly accelerated by an independent improvement in conditions associated with lower birth rates in rural areas, including sustained increases in household incomes, broad improvements in education indicators, especially among women, and expanded access to healthcare facilities and family planning services.

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