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Economic & Sector Work :: Policy Note

Botswana Labor Market Signals on Demand for Skills

ACCESS TO EDUCATION ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACCESS TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACTIVE LABOR ACTIVE LABOR MARKET ACTIVE LABOR MARKET PROGRAMS ADJUSTMENT PROCESS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORKERS APTITUDES BASIC EDUCATION BASIC EDUCATION NEEDS BASIC EDUCATION SYSTEM BASIC LITERACY BASIC SKILLS CAREER COUNSELING CARPENTERS CLERKS COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS CREATIVE THINKING CRITICAL THINKING DEMAND FOR EDUCATION DIPLOMAS DRIVERS EARNING EDUCATED WORKERS EDUCATION LEVEL EDUCATION QUALITY EDUCATION REFORM EDUCATION SECTOR EDUCATION SYSTEM EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT EDUCATIONAL CREDENTIALS EDUCATIONAL LEVELS EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES EDUCATIONAL QUALITY EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH EDUCATORS ELECTRICIANS EMPLOYEE EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT GROWTH EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS EMPLOYMENT PROSPECTS EMPLOYMENT SERVICES ENGINEERING EDUCATION ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS FINDING WORK FIRM SIZE FOREIGN OWNERSHIP FOREIGN WORKERS FOREIGN-OWNED FIRMS GENDER DIFFERENCES GENERAL EDUCATION GENERIC SKILLS HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT RATES HIGHER EDUCATION HIGHER LEVELS OF EDUCATION HOUSEHOLD INCOME HUMAN DEVELOPMENT HUMAN RESOURCE HUMAN RESOURCES IN-SERVICE TRAINING INCOME SUPPORT INCOME SUPPORT PROGRAMS INFORMAL EMPLOYMENT INFORMAL SECTOR INTERVENTIONS INVESTMENT IN EDUCATION INVESTMENTS IN EDUCATION JOB EXPERIENCE JOB SKILLS JOBS JUNIOR CERTIFICATE LABOR DEMAND LABOR FORCE LABOR FORCE DEMANDS LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION LABOR MARKET LABOR MARKET CHARACTERISTICS LABOR MARKET INSTITUTIONS LABOR MARKETS LABOR ORGANIZATION LABOR PRODUCTIVITY LABOR STATISTICS LABOR UNIONS LABOR-INTENSIVE GROWTH LABORERS LABOUR LABOUR FORCE LABOUR STATISTICS LEADERSHIP LEARNING LEVEL OF EDUCATION LEVELS OF EDUCATION LEVELS OF LITERACY LITERACY SKILLS LOWER LEVELS OF EDUCATION LOWER SECONDARY EDUCATION NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANS NUMERACY OCCUPATION OCCUPATIONS ON-THEJOB TRAINING PAPERS PAYING JOBS PERSISTENT UNEMPLOYMENT POST SECONDARY EDUCATION PREVIOUS WORK PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE PRIMARY EDUCATION PRIMARY LEVEL PRIMARY SCHOOL PRINTING PRIVATE EDUCATION PRIVATE SECTOR PROBLEM SOLVING PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS PRODUCTION PROCESSES PROFESSORS PUBLIC WORKS PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAMS QUALITY OF EDUCATION RATES OF RETURN READING RETAIL TRADE RETURNS TO EDUCATION RISING UNEMPLOYMENT RURAL AREAS RURAL SCHOOLS SAFETY NET SALARIED EMPLOYMENT SANITATION SECONDARY SCHOOLING SELF EMPLOYED SERVICE PROVIDERS SERVICE SECTOR SKILL REQUIREMENTS SKILLED LABOR SKILLED MANPOWER SKILLED OCCUPATIONS SKILLED WORKER SKILLED WORKERS SKILLED WORKFORCE SKILLS ACQUISITION SKILLS DEVELOPMENT SKILLS REQUIREMENTS SKILLS TRAINING SOCIAL SKILLS TEACHER TEACHER EDUCATORS TEACHERS TEACHING TEACHING METHODS TECHNICAL EDUCATION TECHNICAL TRAINING TEMPORARY WORKERS TERTIARY EDUCATION TOTAL EMPLOYMENT TRAINING CURRICULA TRAINING INSTITUTIONS TRAVEL AGENTS UNEMPLOYED UNEMPLOYED WORKERS UNEMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT PROBLEM UNEMPLOYMENT RATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES UNIVERSITIES UNPAID WORKERS UNSKILLED LABOR UNSKILLED WORKERS VOCATIONAL EDUCATION VOCATIONAL SKILLS VOCATIONAL TRAINING WAGE COMPRESSION WAGE LEVELS WORKER WORKFORCE SKILLS YOUTH
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Washington, DC
Africa | Botswana
2015-01-05T20:26:55Z | 2015-01-05T20:26:55Z | 2014-01

Botswana has an official unemployment rate of 17.8 percent. The low labor-intensity of growth is a potential explaining factor for this high level of unemployment. It is thus essential to analyze the role of education and training in the access to employment. This note finds that the role of education has changed under the effect of schooling expansion and persistent unemployment. Labor market institutions appear to have a limited impact on employment and wage levels, while the importance of active labor market programs is growing. This note aims to identify labor market signals that point to demand for specific current and future skills. The note seeks to answer the following questions: does the labor market place a higher premium on workers literacy and numeracy skills, technical skills, or behavioral skills?; is the labor market more in need of secondary or tertiary education graduates?; and will growing economic sectors (for example, tourism) benefit more by increasing the supply of sector-specific skills (for example, through specific training for tour guides and hospitality staff) or general skills (for example, through training of lawyers and accountants who can be absorbed in any sector of the economy)?.This note analyzes the following data and documentation to identify labor market signals in the Botswana economy: government economic growth and diversification strategies; general labor market data; and enterprise and employee surveys.

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