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The Impact of Household Food Consumption Data Collection Methods on Poverty and Inequality Measures in Niger

ABSOLUTE POVERTY ACCESS TO INFRASTRUCTURE AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES AGRICULTURAL SEASON AGRICULTURE APPLES ASSESSING WELFARE BREAD CALORIE INTAKE CALORIES PER DAY CALORIES PER PERSON CALORIES PER PERSON PER DAY CASE STUDY CASH EXPENDITURES CEREALS COMPARING POVERTY CONSISTENT POVERTY CONSUMER PREFERENCE CONSUMPTION AGGREGATE CONSUMPTION DISTRIBUTION CONSUMPTION PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION PRICE COOKING DAIRY DATES DECLINE IN POVERTY DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DEVELOPMENT ISSUES DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH ECONOMIC GROWTH EGGS EXPENDITURE DATA EXPENDITURE INFORMATION FAMILY MEMBERS FOOD COMPONENTS FOOD CONSUMPTION FOOD CONSUMPTION DATA FOOD CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURE FOOD CONSUMPTION INFORMATION FOOD EXPENDITURE FOOD EXPENDITURES FOOD ITEMS FOOD PRODUCT FOOD SECURITY HEALTH EXPENDITURES HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION HOUSEHOLD DEMOGRAPHICS HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES HOUSEHOLD HEADS HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS HOUSEHOLD SIZE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY HOUSEHOLD SURVEYS HOUSING ILLITERACY IMPACT ON POVERTY INCOME INEQUALITY IRRIGATION LIVING STANDARDS LIVING STANDARDS MEASUREMENT MAIZE MEASURED POVERTY MEASURING POVERTY MEAT MILK MONITORING POVERTY MONTHLY EXPENDITURE NATIONAL POVERTY NATIONAL POVERTY LINE NON-FOOD COMPONENT NON-FOOD COMPONENTS NON-FOOD CONSUMPTION NON-FOOD EXPENDITURE NON-FOOD ITEMS NONFOOD COMPONENT NUTRITION ORANGES PEANUTS PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION POLICY RESEARCH POOR POOR PEOPLE POVERTY ASSESSMENT POVERTY COMPARISON POVERTY COMPARISONS POVERTY ESTIMATES POVERTY GAP POVERTY INDICATORS POVERTY LEVEL POVERTY LEVELS POVERTY LINE POVERTY LINES POVERTY MEASUREMENT POVERTY MEASURES PRICE INFORMATION RICE RURAL RURAL AREAS RURAL POPULATION RURAL POPULATIONS SQUARED POVERTY GAP STANDARD ERRORS SURVIVAL STRATEGIES TARGETING UNDERSTANDING OF POVERTY URBAN AREAS WELFARE DISTRIBUTION WELFARE INDICATOR WELFARE INDICATORS WELFARE LEVEL WELFARE MEASURE
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World Bank Group, Washington, DC
Africa | Niger
2014-12-03T19:39:36Z | 2014-12-03T19:39:36Z | 2014-11

This paper assesses the impact of three methodologies of food data collection on the welfare distribution, and poverty and inequality measures in Niger. The first methodology is a 7-day recall period, the second one is a usual month, and the third one is a 7-day diary. The paper finds that there is a difference in the distribution of welfare between, on the one hand, the two first methodologies (7-day recall and a usual month, which give results close to each other) and, on the other hand, the 7-day diary method. When considering annual per capita consumption, the 7-day diary lags the 7-day recall by 28 percent. This gap is not only at the mean of the distribution, it has been found at any level. These differences lead to differences in poverty and inequality measures even when alternate poverty lines are used. This study underscores the problem that many developing countries face when it comes to monitoring poverty indicators over time where different methodologies have been used over the years.

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