Skip navigation

Working Paper

Do Public Health Interventions Crowd Out Private Health Investments? : Malaria Control Policies in Eritrea

COMMUNITIES HOUSEHOLD SIZE TREATMENT ANAEMIA VILLAGES PEOPLE SHOPS SPOUSE PSYCHOLOGY PREVENTION SOCIAL RESEARCH ROOMS LEVELS OF EDUCATION SERVICES DEVELOPING COUNTRIES HEALTH INSURANCE MALARIA CONTROL PREVALENCE EFFECTS SLEEP HEALTH POLICY DISCUSSIONS IMPACT ON CHILDREN ALLERGIC REACTIONS MALARIA BURDEN PROJECT GLOBAL POVERTY DANGERS PUBLIC HEALTH PROVISION OF INFORMATION KNOWLEDGE PUBLIC POLICY MINISTRY OF HEALTH PUBLIC INFORMATION DISEASES BACK MALARIA VENTILATION PATIENT PATIENTS RESOURCE CONSTRAINTS DWELLING INTERVENTION FAMILY SIZE ADOPTION INHABITANTS OBSERVATION HIV INFECTION INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS MARKETING EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYMPTOMS PRIMARY SCHOOL HIV/AIDS INTERVIEW TEENAGERS RADIO GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT DESIGN HIV TESTING PROGRESS MALARIA TRANSMISSION INFORMATION CAMPAIGNS NUMBER OF ADULTS UNEMPLOYMENT DIET HOUSEHOLD LEVEL MALARIA INFECTIONS TEENAGE PREGNANCY WORKERS PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS FATIGUE POLICIES AGED RISKY BEHAVIOR GENDER DIFFERENCES MALARIA INFECTION HIV DESCRIPTION PARTICIPATION POLICY RESEARCH WORKING PAPER GENDER HEALTH AUTHORITIES HEALTH POLICY MEDICINE RISK OF MALARIA HYGIENE HOUSEHOLD MALARIA INCIDENCE HEALTH BEHAVIOR YOUTH DECISION MAKING MOSQUITO NET IFS MEASUREMENT VECTORS MALARIA MALARIA HABITAT POPULATIONS MARKET RISK OF INFECTION YOUNG CHILDREN MALARIA POLICY REST WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION HEALTH POLICIES PREGNANT WOMEN TROPICAL MEDICINE PREVENTION OF MALARIA CHILDREN MALARIA SYMPTOMS FEMALES DISEASE VILLAGE LEVEL DRINKING WATER HOUSEHOLDS MOSQUITO NETS INFECTION VECTOR CONTROL INFECTIONS YOUNG PEOPLE ALL DWELLINGS POPULATION FACILITIES LABOR SUPPLY HOUSES POLICY RESEARCH INTERVENTIONS COMMUNITY STRATEGY FAMILIES WOMEN EBOLA IMPACT OF MALARIA MALARIA-ENDEMIC REGIONS MALARIA CASES HEALTH INTERVENTIONS MALARIA PREVENTION FEMALE ENDEMIC AREAS SOCIAL WORKERS HEALTH SERVICES IMPLEMENTATION PREGNANCY SERVICE SCHOOL AGE CONTAMINATION DEVELOPMENT POLICY
68
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Eritrea
2015-06-02T18:51:20Z | 2015-06-02T18:51:20Z | 2015-05

It is often argued that engaging in indoor residual spraying in areas with high coverage of mosquito bed nets may discourage net ownership and use. This is just a case of a public program having perverse incentives. This paper analyzes new data from a randomized control trial conducted in Eritrea, which surprisingly shows the opposite: indoor residual spraying encouraged net acquisition and use. The evidence points to the role of imperfect information. The introduction of indoor residual spraying may have made the problem of malaria more salient, leading to a change in beliefs about its importance and to an increase in private health investments.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period