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Baseline and Feasibility Assessment for Alternative Cooking Fuels in Senegal

ACCESS TO MODERN ENERGY AGRICULTURAL RESIDUES AIR POLLUTION ALTERNATIVE ENERGIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL ALTERNATIVE FUELS ALTERNATIVE USES ANIMAL DUNG ANIMAL WASTE APPLIANCES APPROACH AVAILABILITY BIOENERGY BIOFUEL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION BIOFUELS BIOGAS BIOGAS PRODUCTION BIOGAS SYSTEM BIOGAS SYSTEMS BIOGAS TECHNOLOGY BIOMASS BIOMASS FUELS BIOMASS MATERIALS BIOMASS RESOURCES BIOMASS STOVES BIOMASS USAGE BRIQUETTES CALORIFIC VALUES CANE RESIDUE CAPACITY BUILDING CHARCOAL CHARCOAL DUST CHARCOAL PRICES CHARCOAL PRODUCTION CITIES CLEAN FUELS CLEANER BURNING CLEANER FUELS COOKING COOKING FUELS COOKING STOVES CORN DEMAND FOR ETHANOL DIRTY FUEL DISTRIBUTION NETWORK DOMESTIC ENERGY DOMESTIC FUEL DUNG ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS EFFICIENT STOVES ELECTRICITY EMISSION EMISSION LEVELS EMISSIONS EMPLOYMENT ENERGY ACCESS ENERGY CRISIS ENERGY CROPS ENERGY DEMAND ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY EXPENDITURE ENERGY MANAGEMENT ENERGY RESOURCES ENERGY SERVICES ENERGY USAGE ENERGY USE ENVIRONMENT FUND ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ESP ETHANOL ETHANOL MARKET ETHANOL PLANT ETHANOL PRODUCTION FEEDSTOCK FEEDSTOCKS FOOD CROPS FUEL COLLECTION FUEL CONSUMPTION FUEL COSTS FUEL MIX FUEL PRICE FUEL PRICES FUEL PRODUCTION FUEL SUBSTITUTION FUEL TANKS FUEL TYPE FUEL TYPES FUEL USE FUELS FUELWOOD GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT HOUSEHOLD COOKING HOUSEHOLD ENERGY HOUSEHOLD FUEL HOUSEHOLD FUELS HOUSING INCOME INDOOR AIR POLLUTION JATROPHA LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS LPG LPG STOVES MODERN FUELS OIL EXPLORATION OIL PRICES OIL PRODUCTION PETROLEUM PETROLEUM GAS PLANT OIL POWER PRIMARY ENERGY PRIMARY ENERGY DEMAND PRODUCTION OF CHARCOAL RAINFALL RAW MATERIALS RENEWABLE ENERGY RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES RICE HUSKS RURAL AREAS RURAL ELECTRIFICATION RURAL ENERGY RURAL HOUSEHOLDS SMOKE SOLAR SYSTEMS SOLID FUEL SOLID FUELS SORGHUM STALKS SUGAR SUGAR CANE SUGARCANE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY TARGETED SUBSIDIES TRADITIONAL FUELS TRANSPORT COSTS URBAN AREA URBAN AREAS URBAN CENTRES URBAN HOUSEHOLD URBAN HOUSEHOLDS URBAN POOR URBAN POPULATION USE OF BIOMASS WHOLESALE PRICE WINDS WOOD WOOD FUEL
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Senegal
2014-07-21T20:44:39Z | 2014-07-21T20:44:39Z | 2014-05

This report was prepared by Practical Action Consulting for the Africa Clean Cooking Energy Solutions (ACCES) initiative of the World Bank. Most of Sub-Saharan Africa continues to rely overwhelmingly on traditional fuels and cooking technologies, both of which are a major cause of death and illness as well as a range of socio-economic and environmental problems. More than 90 per cent of the rural population of Senegal relies on solid fuels (charcoal and firewood in particular, but also dung and agricultural residues) to meet its household cooking needs. The primary objective of this study is, (a) to establish a baseline for the current level of penetration of four alternative cooking fuels in Senegal in a number of pre-identified regions, and (b) to assess the feasibility of adopting them in those regions. The four fuels are briquettes from charcoal dust and agricultural residues; ethanol, mainly from sugar cane residue (that is, molasses); pure plant oil (PPO) from locally grown, oil-bearing plants such as Jatropha curcas; and a household biogas system using mainly livestock waste. Against this background, the World Bank commissioned this study to assess the feasibility of promoting the use of a number of alternative cooking fuels in Senegal, which were pre-identified for possible support under its Sustainable and Participatory Energy Management Project (PROGEDE II). Four alternative fuels were analysed in terms of their potential for adoption by households for cooking, each in a different region of Senegal: (a) briquettes in Dakar, (b) ethanol in Saint-Louis, (c) biogas in Kaolack, and (d) pure plant oil (PPO) in Tambacounda. The study includes a baseline assessment of household cooking fuels in Senegal, including a number of alternative fuels, as well as an analysis of their potential supply chains. Its objective is to inform a range of relevant stakeholders, in particular the Ministry of Energy and Mines in Senegal, the World Bank's PROGEDE II, nongovernmental organisations, investors and private sector companies, about strategies to increase production of and access to these alternative fuels. The study also presents important lessons on each alternative fuel deriving from household surveys in each region, a review of the relevant literature, interviews with stakeholder organisations, and focus group discussions (FGDs).

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