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Working Paper

Can Improved Biomass Cookstoves Contribute to REDD+ in Low-Income Countries? : Evidence from a Controlled Cooking Test Trial with Randomized Behavioral Treatments

WOOD DUNG FOREST DEGRADATION BASES TEMPERATURE DRIVERS OF DEFORESTATION AIR QUALITY CALCULATION REDUCING EMISSIONS GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CARBON REFRIGERATION PRODUCERS FLAMMABILITY WIND FOREST CARBON SEQUESTRATION DEFORESTATION PRESSURES BIOMASS STOVES EMISSIONS CARBON MARKETS ATMOSPHERE INCENTIVES SMOKE INTERNATIONAL FORESTRY RESEARCH GAS BURNING STOVE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EMISSION REDUCTIONS AIR GREENHOUSE GAS WASTE HEAT DEVELOPED COUNTRIES BLACK CARBON EMISSIONS BIOMASS CARBON FOOTPRINT CLIMATE BENEFITS CO2 CHARCOAL REMAINING AIR POLLUTION ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCES ENERGY SOURCES SUSTAINABLE ENERGY CAPACITY COOKING FUEL USE BOILING POINT OPTIONS SOLID FUELS LAND USE CHANGE DIFFUSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE LAND DEGRADATION POLLUTION FORESTRY TROPICAL REGIONS FOREST LOSS ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS GAS EMISSIONS ENERGY POLICY FUEL CONSUMPTION CARBON FINANCE FUELS SUBSIDIES EFFICIENCY GREENHOUSE GASES CARBON EMISSIONS FUELWOOD RESOURCES LAND USE WOOD USE RESOURCES FOREST CARBON ENERGY CONSUMPTION EMISSION GREENHOUSE CONSUMPTION LEAD IPCC CROP CLIMATE CHANGE CARBON STORAGE BIOMASS STOVE FOREST COVER ALTERNATIVE ENERGY BLACK CARBON MARKET PRICES CLEAN DEVELOPMENT ELECTRICITY DEFORESTATION CLIMATE FORESTS CHARCOAL FOREST CARBON STOCKS TROPICAL DEFORESTATION CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION FOREST FORESTRY PROJECTS HUMAN BEHAVIOR WOOD SPECIES ENVIRONMENT SOLID FUEL DUST ECONOMICS FOREST HARVESTS CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS MOISTURE CONTENT AIR TEMPERATURE NATURAL GAS LAND VILLAGE LEVEL EMISSIONS FROM DEFORESTATION DUNG COLLECTION FOREST BIOMASS COAL CARBON STOCKS FUEL CARBON MARKET LESS TRADITIONAL STOVES TRADITIONAL STOVE CROP RESIDUES HOUSEHOLD ENERGY ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS RENEWABLE ENERGY ENERGY ACCESS ENVIRONMENTAL GASES FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE CARBON EMISSION PRICES AMBIENT TEMPERATURE BENEFITS LAND ECONOMICS ENERGY
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Ethiopia
2015-08-17T17:44:25Z | 2015-08-17T17:44:25Z | 2015-08

This paper provides field experiment–based evidence on the potential additional forest carbon sequestration that cleaner and more fuel-efficient cookstoves might generate. The paper focuses on the Mirt (meaning “best”) cookstove, which is used to bake injera, the staple food in Ethiopia. The analysis finds that the technology generates per-meal fuel savings of 22 to 31 percent compared with a traditional three-stone stove with little or no increase in cooking time. Because approximately 88 percent of harvests from Ethiopian forests are unsustainable, these findings suggest that the Mirt stove, and potentially improved cookstoves more generally, can contribute to reduced forest degradation. These savings may be creditable under the United Nations Collaborative Program on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries. Because of the highly specific nature of the Mirt stove and the lack of refrigeration in rural Ethiopia, rebound effects are unlikely, but this analysis was unable completely to rule out such leakage. The conclusions are therefore indicative, pending evidence on the frequency of Mirt stove use in the field. The effects of six randomized behavioral treatments on fuelwood and cooking time outcomes were also evaluated, but limited effects were found.

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