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Health Service Delivery in Tanzania

WASTE BIRTH CLINICAL GUIDELINES TREATMENT ANAEMIA HEALTH SERVICE DELIVERY DIAGNOSIS CHRONIC DISEASES VACCINATION FINANCING FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT DIABETES MELLITUS VIRAL HEPATITIS PHARMACISTS DEATHS INCOME DOCTORS MORBIDITY BASIC HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY HEALTH HEALTH INSURANCE HEALTH CARE DEATH PREVALENCE INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ILLNESSES EFFECTS INCENTIVES NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE HEALTH HEALTH PROFESSIONALS HEALTH WORKERS BASIC HEALTH VIRUS INFECTION HYPERTENSION VIRUSES DEHYDRATION HEALTH FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH QUALITY OF HEALTH KNOWLEDGE ANEMIA HEALTH SECTOR CHOICE DIABETES PATHOGENS DISEASES IRON COSTS STERILIZATION PILL INFECTIOUS DISEASES PATIENTS PATIENT LIFE BLOOD TRANSFUSION PROBABILITY HEALTH SYSTEMS HEALTH CENTERS NURSES OBSERVATION HEALTH MANAGEMENT TETANUS BCG HEALTH WORKFORCE TUBERCULOSIS FOLIC ACID SYMPTOMS HEALTH ORGANIZATION VOMITING SCREENING MORTALITY POSTERS DIAGNOSES MEDICAL DOCTOR HEALTH SPECIALIST WORKERS FEVER CAESAREAN SECTION HIV TB SURVEILLANCE FLUSH TOILETS CARE HEALTHCARE WORKERS BUDGETS DIARRHEA HEALTH FACILITIES HEPATITIS B MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS FEMALE CONDOMS STD MEDICAL SUPPLIES MEDICAL EQUIPMENT HEALTH CLINICS MEASUREMENT ASPHYXIA VECTORS MEASLES COLD CHAIN NEONATAL DEATH HEALTH POSTS SYRINGES MALARIA HEALTH CARE WASTE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE BURDEN OF DISEASE WASTE DISPOSAL PNEUMONIA HEPATITIS INTERNET MALE CONDOMS HEMORRHAGE HEALTH SYSTEM INSURANCE VACCINES WEIGHT PREGNANT WOMEN AMBULANCE VIRUS CHILDREN DISEASE CLINICS HEPATITIS B VIRUS WORKING CONDITIONS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE HUMAN RESOURCES HEALTH FOR ALL HEALTH PROVIDERS POVERTY INFECTION DISEASE VECTORS GRID FINANCIAL PLANNING ALL POPULATION POLIO LATRINES INFECTION RATE STRATEGY DIARRHOEA FEES SODIUM MEDICINES FORCEPS HEALTH FINANCING VACCINE HOSPITALS AMBULANCE SERVICES ILLNESSES HEALTH SERVICE BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS HEALTH SERVICES IMPLEMENTATION CONDOMS CONVULSIONS INFANT DEATHS HUMAN DEVELOPMENT STORAGE
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Tanzania
2016-08-04T14:57:00Z | 2016-08-04T14:57:00Z | 2015-01

The Service Delivery Indicators (SDIs) provides a set of key indicators serving as a benchmark for service delivery performance in the health and education sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa. The overarching objective of the SDIs is to ascertain the quality of service delivery in primary education and basic health services. This would in turn enable governments and service providers alike to identify gaps and bottlenecks, as well as track progress over time, and across countries. The SDI survey interviewed 403 heath providers across Tanzania between May 2014 and July 2014. This technical report presents the findings from the implementation of the SDI in the health sector in Tanzania in 2014. Survey implementation activities took place following extensive consultations with the government and key stakeholders on survey design, sampling, and adaptation of survey instruments. A major challenge for Tanzania’s health sector is the shortage of skilled human resources for health (HRH). This survey found that provider knowledge and abilities were not adequate to deliver quality services. Caseload per provider and absenteeism are relatively low, so the issue is not over burdened providers. There seems to be ample room for a significant increase in the caseload of Tanzanian providers, i.e. the level of productivity in health service delivery, without jeopardizing quality. In addition to increasing the volume of skilled HRH to address the shortage of providers, improvements in management, supervision and training is important to improving service delivery. Health for all in Tanzania will mean the simultaneous availability of widely accessible inputs and skilled providers.

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