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Working Paper

When Institutions Work : Nigeria's Ebola Response

MEDICAL PRACTICE CHILD HEALTH EPIDEMIOLOGISTS RISKS TREATMENT DIAGNOSIS DISEASE OUTBREAK EBOLA VIRUS INFORMATION SYSTEM HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS PREVENTION POLIO ERADICATION INITIATIVE MORBIDITY REDUCING MATERNAL MORTALITY RESOURCE ALLOCATION HEALTH RESEARCH HEALTH CARE HEALTH SURVEYS DEATH EFFECTS HEALTH EPIDEMIC HEALTH WORKERS PUBLICATIONS NATIONAL LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SYNDROME HEALTH FACILITIES HOSPITAL PUBLIC HEALTH NATIONAL CAPACITIES MATERNAL MORTALITY QUALITATIVE APPROACH HEALTH SECTOR KNOWLEDGE POLICY RESPONSE TECHNICAL CAPACITY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE MINISTRY OF HEALTH DISEASES MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL TRAINING INFECTIOUS DISEASES PATIENTS PATIENT LIFE INTERVENTION POISONING HUMANITARIAN AFFAIRS PEDAGOGY EMERGENCIES HEALTH MANAGEMENT PARALYSIS HAZARD DISSEMINATION EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYMPTOMS SERVICE DELIVERY NATURAL RESOURCES GLOBAL HEALTH INTERVIEW MORTALITY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM TECHNICAL RESOURCES ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE PROGRESS DISEASE OUTBREAKS LARGE POPULATION DIAGNOSES HEALTH REGULATIONS INFANT WORKERS FEVER USE OF RESOURCES POLICIES FATIGUE INFLUENZA HIV SURVEILLANCE AGGRESSIVENESS IMMUNODEFICIENCY POLICY MAKERS SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS HEALTH POLICY MEDICINE HEALTH SECTOR REFORM MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY URBAN AREAS EMERGENCY   RESPONSE MEDICAL PERSONNEL DECISION MAKING MALNUTRITION POLIO ERADICATION ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS DISEASE_SURVEILLANCE NUTRITION ANTIMALARIALS INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY QUALITY CONTROL INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE POLICY HEALTH SURVEILLANCE REST PRIMARY HEALTH CARE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION THERAPY DIAGNOSTICS INTERNET CHILD MORTALITY AVIAN INFLUENZA CHILD MORTALITY RATES HEALTH SYSTEM VACCINES WEIGHT PHYSICIANS HUMAN RIGHTS VIRUS EXERCISE CHILDREN DISEASE DISEASE CONTROL CLINICS WORKING CONDITIONS WAR DISEASE SURVEILLANCE RISK OF EXPOSURE ILLNESS INFECTION INFECTIONS ALL POPULATION POLIO DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH MEDICAL ETHICS PLAGUE INFECTION RATES VISION LEAD POISONING CIVIL WAR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS STRATEGY FLOW OF INFORMATION FERTILITY EPIDEMIOLOGY RISK OF DEATH EBOLA EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEMS HEALTH INTERVENTIONS PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS HEALTH SERVICES IMPLEMENTATION BLIND SERVICE PROVIDERS PRINT MEDIA LASSA FEVER
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Nigeria
2015-10-19T20:07:02Z | 2015-10-19T20:07:02Z | 2015-05

Nigeria is a country of immense natural resources and potential, but the government’s capacity to deliver public goods has generally been weak. It was against this backdrop that Nigeria faced the arrival within its borders of the deadly Ebola virus disease in July 2014. Despite assurances that the Nigerian government was prepared to respond to an outbreak of Ebola, the country was caught unaware and forced to mount an emergency response. Yet despite these serious concerns, the spread of Ebola was successfully contained in Nigeria. This case study seeks to understand why Nigeria’s Ebola response was so successful despite the challenging context. The case study will focus on institutional architecture and political will, taking an exploratory qualitative approach to examine the institutional dynamics and motivations among various stakeholders involved in the country’s response. The aim is to distill lessons that may be applied to other emergency response initiatives, as well as elsewhere in the health sector and in other areas of service delivery. A proactive communication strategy is required to build a broader coalition of support, and demand-side actors such as nongovernmental organizations play a helpful role.

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