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Working Paper

The Impact of Private Sector Internship and Training on Urban Youth in Kenya

SKILLS JOBS EMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE EDUCATED WORKERS COLLEGE DEGREE NATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT RATE BASIC EDUCATION FORMAL EDUCATION VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM PERSONALITY WORK EXPERIENCE PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP DROPOUT RATES YOUTH EMPLOYMENT SOCIAL SKILLS SCHOOLING FEMALE YOUTH VOCATIONAL EDUCATION LEVELS OF EDUCATION SKILLS DEVELOPMENT SKILLS TRAINING GROUPS AGE GROUP LEVELS OF EDUCATION HEALTH INSURANCE LIFE SKILLS PROBLEM‐SOLVING FORMAL EDUCATION UNEMPLOYED POPULATION SECONDARY CERTIFICATE JOB FEMALE EMPLOYMENT COLLEGE DEGREE COMPUTER SKILLS NATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT EDUCATION ATTAINMENT ACCESS TO TRAINING PROGRAM COMPLETION EMPLOYMENT RATES LEVEL OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAMS ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS ADULTS SECONDARY SCHOOL GENDER DISPARITY EXAM TRAINING CENTERS ACTIVE LABOR DRIVERS TRAINING PROGRAMS JOB SEEKERS TRAINEES LITERACY WORK EXPERIENCE KNOWLEDGE EDUCATED WORKERS LABOR MARKET SKILL TRAINING FORMAL SCHOOLING SYSTEM SKILL DEVELOPMENT ENTREPRENEURSHIP TRAINING GENDER DISPARITY COGNITIVE SKILLS TRAINING TEACHER TRAINING DECISION‐MAKING SOCIAL SKILLS SECONDARY SCHOOLS ACTIVE LABOR MARKET TRAINING CENTERS SECONDARY SCHOOL UNEMPLOYED JOB TRAINING WRITING SKILLS SELF‐EMPLOYED BASIC EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION LEARNING JOB TRAINING LABOR PRIMARY SCHOOL EDUCATION ATTAINMENT JOB SEARCH MONTHLY STIPEND RETENTION RATE PROBLEM SOLVING BASIC SKILLS RETENTION RATE SKILL TRAINING ADOLESCENT GIRLS SECONDARY EDUCATION READING ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS UNEMPLOYMENT TECHNOLOGY ACCESS TO TRAINING LIFE SKILLS COMPONENT PRIMARY SCHOOL HUMAN CAPITAL VOCATIONAL TRAINING DROPOUT RATES YOUTH POPULATION LITERACY SKILLS WORKERS TRAINING COURSES TRAINING COURSES SKILLS TRAINING LABOR MARKET PROGRAMS ATTITUDES ADOLESCENT GIRLS GENDER DIFFERENCES UNEMPLOYMENT RATE SCHOOLS ACCESS TO CAPITAL LABOR DEMAND TRAINING COMPONENT PARTICIPATION ACTIVE LABOR MARKET PROGRAMS CURRICULA ACCESS TO CAPITAL OCCUPATIONS LIFE SKILLS COMPONENT PRIVATE PROVISION SELF‐ EMPLOYED FORMAL SCHOOLING SYSTEM MONTHLY STIPEND PRIVATE FIRMS YOUNG PEOPLE YOUTH LABOR MARKET OUTCOMES PRIVATE SECTOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP TRAINING GENDER DISPARITIES WORKSHOPS INTERNSHIPS OLDER ADULTS TEACHER JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE FORMAL SCHOOLING RURAL AREAS TRAINING CONTENTS COGNITIVE SKILLS WRITING CHILDREN LEVEL OF EDUCATION EMPLOYABILITY SELF‐ESTEEM EDUCATION SKILL DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT TERTIARY EDUCATION FEMALE YOUTH RURAL AREAS MALE PARTICIPANTS BASIC SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAM JOB PLACEMENT SKILLS DEVELOPMENT YOUNG PEOPLE PROBLEM SOLVING LIFE SKILLS GIRLS LEADERSHIP INTERVENTIONS VOCATIONAL TRAINING PRIMARY EDUCATION FINDING WORK FEES UNEMPLOYED JOB SEEKERS OLDER ADULTS PRIMARY EDUCATION WOMEN YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT FIRM GROWTH FORMAL SCHOOLING CLASSROOM CHILDCARE SCHOOL SECONDARY EDUCATION TERTIARY EDUCATION SECONDARY CERTIFICATE PRIVATE SECTORS GENDER DIFFERENCES GENDER DISPARITIES YOUTH POPULATION WAGE EMPLOYMENT UNIVERSITIES APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Kenya
2015-09-23T18:51:57Z | 2015-09-23T18:51:57Z | 2015-08

This study uses a randomized experiment to evaluate the impacts of the training and internship program piloted in Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu counties by the Kenya Private Sector Alliance and the Government of Kenya with support from the World Bank’s Kenya Youth Empowerment Project. The program provided three months of classroom-based technical training coupled with three months of internships in private firms to vulnerable youths between ages 15 and 29 years, with vulnerable being defined as those out of school and/or with no permanent job. The analysis in this paper is based on survey data collected before the program started (July 2012) and 15 months after the program ended (July 2014). The results of the impact evaluation show that the program has been successful in placing youths in paid jobs and has contributed to an increase of 15 percent in current employment among male participants. The evaluation also found that the program has had positive effects on wage earnings, especially those of females and among older males, with wages increasing by about K Sh 5,000 for males and by K Sh 7,500 for females. With a total unit cost of K Sh 97,000 per beneficiary, an estimated K Sh 6,768 monthly wage for males and K Sh 9,623 monthly wage for females, the program’s benefits exceeded the costs for males and females. The program also encouraged youths to participate in either (certified) skills training or an internship program, and helped to increase the probability of participants’ opening a bank account and accumulating savings (for females).

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