Skip navigation

Working Paper

Institutional Change, Political Economy, and State Capabilities : Learning from Edo State, Nigeria

EMPLOYMENT FINANCIAL SERVICES REVOLUTION ACCOUNTING NATIONAL ACCOUNTS FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PRINCIPAL AUTONOMY INTEREST STATE ADMINISTRATION GUARANTEES PUBLIC SECTOR GOVERNMENT INDUSTRY NATIONS RESPONSIBILITY STRATEGIES POLITICIANS GOOD GOVERNANCE POLITICAL “SURVIVAL WATER SUPPLY SERVICES DECISION MAKERS HOUSING CONSUMPTION TAXES PROJECTS AUTHORITIES CORRUPTION FISCAL FEDERALISM CASH FLOWS BUREAUCRACY BUILDING STATE CAPACITY LOCAL TAX INSTITUTION BUILDING PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTIONAL MECHANISMS STATES EXECUTION AUTHORITY TRANSPORT DEMOCRACY POLITICAL POWER TRANSFERS MINISTRIES CENTRALIZATION MARKETS TECHNOCRATS STATE AUTHORITIES DEFICITS INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS PUBLIC FINANCE GOVERNANCE INDICATORS EXPENDITURE MANAGEMENT POLITICAL CONFLICT GOVERNMENT RESOURCES LABOR LOANS INVENTORY ECONOMIC REFORM FINANCE NATIONALISTS INFRASTRUCTURE TAXES BANKS EXPENDITURE INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS INCOME TAXES FISCAL HUMAN CAPITAL AUTHORIZATION ACCOUNTABILITY TRANSPARENCY SOCIAL SERVICES STATE GOVERNMENT PUBLIC EXPENDITURE ELECTED OFFICIALS SUBSIDIARIES VALUE BANK CREDIT CADRES CONSTITUENCY PROPERTY POLITICAL INTERFERENCE INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY STATE REGULATION TRANSACTION COSTS REGULATION CONSTITUENCIES CITIZENS POLITICAL ELITES SUBSIDIARY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONAL REFORM PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT SOCIAL POWER SOCIAL CAPITAL TAXATION CONSENSUS PUBLIC MANAGEMENT STATE LAND REGIONS RISK PUBLIC EXPENDITURE MANAGEMENT COALITIONS MINISTRY OF FINANCE FISCAL MANAGEMENT FEDERATION PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FEDERALISM STATE AGENCIES REVENUE LAW LENDING PERSONAL INCOME TAXES RESOURCE CURSE INSURGENCY STATE POWER LEGITIMACY PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT PUBLIC SERVICE GOVERNMENTS CIVIL SERVICE POLITICAL SURVIVAL EXECUTIVE POWER DISTRICTS ECONOMIC CONDITIONS
74
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Nigeria
2015-08-11T16:35:33Z | 2015-08-11T16:35:33Z | 2015-06

This paper is one of a series aimed at deepening the World Bank’s capacity to follow through on commitments made in response to the World Development Report (WDR) 2011, which gave renewed prominence to the nexus between conflict, security, and development. Nigeria is a remarkable illustration of how deeply intractable the cycle of poverty, conflict, and fragility can become when tied to the ferocious battles associated with the political economy of oil. This paper places the corpus of analytic and programmatic work concerning institutional reform in conversation with a now substantial body of work on resource politics and most especially, the debate over the politico-institutional character (sometimes called political settlements or pacting arrangements associated with the order of power) and reform landscape of the petro-state. Recent institution reform policy writing appears to have little to say about the political and economic conditions in which crises and institutional disjunctures may authorize, and thereby enable, agents to embark on institutional reforms. The authors focus on Edo state for two reasons. First, it does not on its face appear to be an obvious location in which to explore a reform experience, given its entanglement in the Niger Delta conflict and the maladies typically associated with state fragility. Second, Edo is of interest also because of the changes that its experience is contributing to the World Bank country team’s effort to engage operationally across all its instruments with the political economy of institutional reform in Nigeria, its largest client country in Africa.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period