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Working Paper

Do Improved Biomass Cookstoves Reduce Fuelwood Consumption and Carbon Emissions? : Evidence from Rural Ethiopia Using a Randomized Treatment Trial with Electronic Monitoring

FOREST DEGRADATION LPG WOOD BURNING TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE FOSSIL FUELS AIR QUALITY FOREST MANAGEMENT BIOMASS FUEL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CARBON REFRIGERATION COOKING STOVES DEFORESTATION PRESSURES EMISSIONS BIOCHEMISTRY COLLECTION METHODS ATMOSPHERE INCENTIVES SMOKE GAS PRICE EMISSION REDUCTIONS AIR GREENHOUSE GAS EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS RENEWABLE BIOMASS BIOMASS CARBON FOOTPRINT CO2 CLIMATIC CONDITIONS STOVES ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS AIR POLLUTION BIOMASS ENERGY USE EMISSION FACTOR ENERGY SOURCES CO2 EMISSIONS COOKING CALORIFIC VALUE FUEL USE OPTIONS WATER DIFFUSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE SURFACE TEMPERATURE POLLUTION FORESTRY ENERGY SECTOR GAS EMISSIONS CHEMISTRY FUEL CONSUMPTION FUEL SWITCHING FUELS EMISSIONS REDUCTION CARBON EMISSIONS AGREE EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS COOKSTOVE ENERGY CONSUMPTION GREENHOUSE EMISSION FUELWOOD SUPPLY FOSSIL FUEL EMISSION HEAT FUEL EFFICIENCY IPCC CLIMATE CHANGE COMMERCIAL ENERGY FOREST COVER ALTERNATIVE ENERGY BLACK CARBON ELECTRICITY WOOD FUEL DEFORESTATION CLIMATE FORESTS HEAT RESISTANT FOSSIL FUEL EMISSION FACTORS FUELWOOD LOGGING FOREST INDOOR AIR QUALITY CLEAN DEVELOPMENT MECHANISM CARBON OFFSET ENERGY USE ECONOMIC THEORY COOKSTOVES BIOMASS FUELS WOODY BIOMASS PRIMARY ENERGY ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY DEMAND ENERGY OUTLOOK FIREWOOD CONSUMPTION CARBON REDUCTIONS TONS OF CARBON EMISSIONS FACTORS NATURAL GAS BIOMASS ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMBUSTION FOREST BIOMASS BIOMASS COOKING COAL BIOMASS COMBUSTION FUEL CARBON MARKET LESS AVAILABILITY INVESTMENTS BIOMASS UTILIZATION HOUSEHOLD ENERGY GASES FUEL SAVINGS FOREST AREA KEROSENE CHARCOAL CONSUMPTION REDUCED CO2 FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE CARBON EMISSION FOSSIL APPROACH AMBIENT TEMPERATURE BENEFITS ENERGY
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Ethiopia
2015-07-17T14:36:15Z | 2015-07-17T14:36:15Z | 2015-06

This paper uses a randomized experimental design with real-time electronic stove temperature measurements and controlled cooking tests to estimate the fuelwood and carbon dioxide savings from an improved cookstove program in the process of being implemented in rural Ethiopia. Knowing more about how households interact with improved cookstoves is important, because cooking uses a majority of the fuelwood in the country and therefore is an important determinant of greenhouse gas emissions and indoor air pollution. Creating local networks among stove users generally appears to increase fuelwood savings, and among monetary treatments the most robust positive effects come from free distribution. The paper estimates that on average one improved stove saves approximately 634 kilograms of fuelwood per year or about 0.94 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year, which is about half of previous estimates. Using the May 2015 California auction price of $13.39/ton, the carbon sequestration from each stove deployed is worth about $12.59. Such carbon market offset revenues would be sufficient to cover the cost of the stove within one year.

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