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Mauritius : Inclusiveness of Growth and Shared Prosperity

JOBS EMPLOYMENT HOUSEHOLD SURVEY INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LABOR POLICIES EMPLOYMENT RATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS NET JOB CREATION WAGE GAP COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS SKILLED WORKERS EMPLOYMENT SHARE RETIREMENT PREVIOUS SECTION INFORMAL SECTOR WAGE DIFFERENTIAL MINIMUM WAGE PRIVATE ENTERPRISES INCOME SUPPORT PROGRAM LABOR MARKET NEEDS PRODUCTIVE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AGE GROUP ECONOMIC VULNERABILITY TOTAL LABOR FORCE LABOR FORCE DOMESTIC MARKET PUBLIC SERVICES CLERICAL WORKERS YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT RATES JOB RISING UNEMPLOYMENT PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT LABOR ECONOMICS SERVANTS WAGE DETERMINATION LABOR STATISTICS WAGE INDICATORS FIRM SIZE EMPLOYMENT RATES INCOME SUPPORT TRAINING PROGRAMS RETAIL TRADE REAL WAGES LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION WAGE GROWTH ACTIVE LABOR LIFE EXPECTANCY DRIVERS JOB SEEKERS WORK EXPERIENCE EMPLOYMENT LEVEL EARNINGS INEQUALITY LABOR MARKET DISADVANTAGED GROUP TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY EXOGENOUS SHOCKS LABOR COSTS EMPLOYMENT LEVELS EMPLOYMENT POLICIES EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FIRM LEVEL BARGAINING POWER WORKER EXPORT PROCESSING ZONE INCOME INEQUALITY LABOR PRODUCTIVITY UNEMPLOYED TOTAL WAGES FIRM-LEVEL ANALYSIS HOUSEHOLD INCOME HOUSEHOLD SURVEYS SELF EMPLOYMENT LABOR SHORTAGES JOB TRAINING LABOR PRIMARY SCHOOL TOTAL EMPLOYMENT HIGH WAGES UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFIT PROGRAM WAGE INCREASE CARPENTERS MINIMUM WAGES SELF-EMPLOYMENT INCOME FEMALE LABOR UNEMPLOYMENT OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION AVERAGE WAGES YOUTH LABOR PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH HUMAN CAPITAL VOCATIONAL TRAINING WORKERS WAGE BARGAINING LABOR MARKET CONDITIONS LABOR MARKET PROGRAMS YOUNG WORKERS TOTAL UNEMPLOYMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE TOTAL WAGE REAL WAGE WAGE INEQUALITY AVERAGE WAGE PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT MALE COUNTERPARTS OCCUPATIONS WHITE-COLLAR OCCUPATIONS AGE GROUPS OCCUPATION INCOME DISTRIBUTION LABOR MARKET CHARACTERISTICS WORKING POOR LABOR MARKET INSTITUTIONS LABOR MARKET OUTCOMES EMPLOYMENT GROWTH INCOME INEQUALITIES JOB CREATION RE-TRAINING PROGRAMS PRIVATE SECTOR EARNING LABOR MARKET INDICATORS COLLECTIVE BARGAINING DISADVANTAGED POSITION SKILLED LABOR MANAGEMENT JOB- SEARCH ASSISTANCE LABOR ORGANIZATION HIGH-TECH INDUSTRY UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFIT EMPLOYMENT GROWTH RATES HIGH-TECH INDUSTRIES LABOUR FORCE WORKING CONDITIONS REALLOCATION EFFECT HUMAN RESOURCES SKILLED OCCUPATIONS PRIVATE COST FEMALE LABOR FORCE FOREIGN WORKERS JOB PLACEMENT PRODUCT MARKETS WAGE DIFFERENTIALS HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION LABOR SUPPLY HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT LABOUR FORCE PARTICIPATION CONSUMER PRICE INDEX INCOME REDISTRIBUTION UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS PRIMARY EDUCATION FINDING WORK EDUCATIONAL LEVELS PRODUCTIVITY GAINS ESTIMATED PROBABILITIES YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT YOUTH RATE WAGE DISTRIBUTION LABOUR LABOR MARKETS PUBLIC SERVICE EDUCATIONAL LEVEL SKILLED OCCUPATION SMALL BUSINESSES LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE PREMIUMS UNEMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCES UNEMPLOYMENT LEVELS PRIVATE ENTERPRISE EMPLOYEES
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Mauritius
2016-03-02T16:26:16Z | 2016-03-02T16:26:16Z | 2015-09

Mauritius is a high middle-income country with low levels of poverty and inequality. The headcount poverty level was 6.9 percent in 2012; measured by the international standard of United States (U.S.) $2 per day (PPP), poverty was less than 1 percent. On inequality, Mauritius also fared well compared to its peer middle-income countries. On the negative side, Mauritius’ growth has not been equally shared, despite the general improvement in welfare. The economy’s polarization was associated with a structural transformation from labor-intensive industries to services and knowledge-intensive industries. Inclusiveness remains the main challenge for the current growth pattern. When Mauritius will be able to become a high-income country will depend on its ability to improve the labor force’s skill set, develop infrastructure, and further improve the business environment to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and generate domestic investment. Reduction in inequality and boost of shared prosperity will require more growth and a more pro-poor pattern of growth. An increase in female labor force participation, reduction of high youth unemployment rates, improving the efficiency of the social protection system will reduce growing skills mismatch facilitating inclusive growth and eradicating poverty in Mauritius.

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