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Tunisia : Systematic Country Diagnostic

TARIFFS SOCIAL COSTS CAPITAL MARKETS CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURES FISH ECONOMIC INCENTIVES UNEMPLOYMENT RATES STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT ECONOMIC GROWTH ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION POLICY ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION WASTE MANAGEMENT DISPOSABLE INCOME CARBON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION EXPECTATIONS ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES PRODUCERS RESOURCE MANAGEMENT RESOURCE ALLOCATION PRICE SETTING LABOR FORCE EMISSIONS POLITICAL ECONOMY REVENUES ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT ECONOMIC EFFECTS INCENTIVES EQUILIBRIUM MODELS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AUDITS ECONOMIC ACTIVITY EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS PRESENT VALUE FISCAL POLICIES EXPLOITATION ARABLE LAND LABOR COSTS WATER PRICING AIR POLLUTION OIL TRADEOFFS GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS NATURAL CAPITAL POPULATION GROWTH CAPITAL FORMATION LABOR PRODUCTIVITY OPTIONS EXTERNALITIES SUSTAINABLE WATER BARRIERS TO ENTRY DEBT LAND DEGRADATION POLLUTION CENTRAL GOVERNMENTS FORESTRY WELFARE GAINS ECONOMIC POLICIES AQUIFERS PRICE SUBSIDIES DEMOGRAPHIC GROWTH POLICY DECISIONS NATURAL RESOURCES SUBSIDIES EFFICIENCY RANGELANDS TAXES CANCER ACCESS TO INFORMATION RESOURCES UNEMPLOYMENT DEREGULATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION EQUITY PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH CONSUMPTION ECONOMIC IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION WAGES CLIMATE CHANGE VALUES ELECTRICITY DEMAND COMPLIANCE COSTS MARKET PRICES PRICE DIFFERENCES CREDIT PURCHASING POWER DEMAND CPI NATIONAL INCOME SUSTAINABLE GROWTH PUBLIC EXPENDITURES ELECTRICITY GENERATION ENVIRONMENTS EXPENDITURES PROPERTY DECISION MAKING ECONOMIC RENTS TAX RATES ENVIRONMENT SOIL DEGRADATION CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK ECONOMIC SITUATION OLIGOPOLIES ECONOMICS WASTE DISPOSAL MARKET COMPETITION ENERGY EFFICIENCY ECONOMIC FACTORS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TRADE LAND ECONOMIES OF SCALE DRINKING WATER CONSUMPTION PATTERNS COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION COAL FARMS DECISION–MAKING MARKET POWER WATER POLLUTION REVENUE EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE PRIVATE CONSUMPTION HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT RISK MANAGEMENT LIVING CONDITIONS TAX REFORM PRICE VARIATIONS ACCELERATOR INTERMEDIATE INPUTS PROFITS ENVIRONMENTAL LABOR MARKETS PRICES DEMOGRAPHICS OIL SECTOR ECONOMIES PRODUCTION PROCESSES COMPETITION
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Middle East and North Africa | Tunisia
2015-11-20T21:44:54Z | 2015-11-20T21:44:54Z | 2015-06

The Tunisia Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD) seeks to identify the challenges and opportunities to achieve the twin goals of reducing poverty and boosting shared prosperity in a sustainable way. This SCD takes into account Tunisia’s historical sociopolitical context and the political economy of past reforms to provide the context for the challenges and opportunities that exist today to make progress toward the twin goals. The economic policies of the two decades preceding the 2011 revolution delivered widely recognized achievements, including growth rates above the regional average, impressive progress in human development indicators and reduced poverty. However, they failed to address, and even exacerbated, the deep-rooted distortions in the economy that closed the channels, in particular, productive employment and job creation, for a more equal and inclusive society. These distortions were also grounded in a tightly controlled social and political space that favored the elite while repressing others. This development model proved to be economically and socially unsustainable. With a new constitution adopted in 2014 and a democratically-elected government established in 2015, there is today an unprecedented window of opportunity for Tunisia to embark on deep structural reforms to open the channels conducive to a more equal and inclusive society and put the country on a path of more sustainable development. The SCD identifies key opportunities to build on Tunisia’s multiple strengths and economic potential to help guide future development policies. It highlights the importance of social and political stability (as well as domestic security) as prerequisites for critical reforms to be undertaken, as well as the importance of voice, transparency, and accountability in all economic and institutional spheres for those reforms to be sustainable.

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