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Working Paper

Reducing Crime and Violence : Experimental Evidence on Adult Noncognitive Investments in Liberia

SKILLS WASTE INFERENCE RISKS TREATMENT MOTIVATION SEX WORKERS COUNSELORS SOCIALIZATION INFORMED CONSENT PERSONALITY PEOPLE ACHIEVEMENT TESTS AGGRESSION PSYCHOLOGY ACTIVITIES BIAS SOCIAL RESEARCH GROUPS INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS THOUGHTS STRATEGIES DEATH EFFECTS SOCIAL BEHAVIOR SLEEP HEALTH PSYCHOLOGISTS DEPRESSION EMOTION PROSTITUTION TOUCH THINKING CRIME ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS KNOWLEDGE DISABILITIES BEHAVIOR EXERCISES PAIN PERSONAL HYGIENE TRAINING LIFE PATIENT PATIENTS ADJUSTMENT INTERVENTION ORT AGGRESSIVE RELATIONSHIPS ABILITY PRETESTING OBSERVATION VIOLENCE ANXIETY NEEDS GROUP THERAPY LEARNING MARIJUANA ADAPTATION SYMPTOMS REASONING POST TRAUMATIC STRESS INTERVIEW RECALL MENTAL HEALTH MODELING COGNITION BELIEFS PSYCHIATRY STUDY DRUG ADDICTION WORKERS SCIENCE AGED ADOLESCENCE HABITS PARTNER ABUSE AGE LIFESTYLE GENDER CHILDHOOD MEDICINE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS HYGIENE ACHIEVEMENT VICTIMS STD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY INHIBITION STRESS EFFORT EARLY CHILDHOOD SOCIAL NETWORKS THERAPIES MEASUREMENT WORKING MEMORY COGNITIVE ABILITY YOUNG CHILDREN ADOLESCENTS HOMELESSNESS COGNITIVE PROCESSES REST THERAPY RISK FACTORS WALKING SEX WEIGHT INTERESTS WRITING UNDERSTANDING EXERCISE CHILDREN AMPUTATION PERSONALITY TRAITS PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT PLAYING CAREER COUNSELING ISOLATION PERFORMANCE ADDICTION EXPERIENCE COUNSELING ATTENTION ACTIVITY ALL INTERACTIONS REHABILITATION COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR STUDENTS TRAUMA RESEARCH PROGRAM LEADERSHIP STRATEGY REGISTRATION FAMILIES MEMORY SELF ESTEEM GAMBLING COMMUNICATION SKILLS SOCIAL WORKERS BEHAVIOR CHANGE IMPLEMENTATION MENTAL CLEANLINESS HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Liberia
2016-05-04T19:56:00Z | 2016-05-04T19:56:00Z | 2016-04

The paper shows that self-control, time preferences, and values are malleable in adults, and that investments in these skills and preferences reduce crime and violence. The authors recruited criminally-engaged Liberian men and randomized half to eight weeks of group cognitive behavioral therapy, fostering self-regulation, patience, and noncriminal values. They also randomized $200 grants. Cash alone and therapy alone dramatically reduced crime and violence, but effects dissipated within a year. When cash followed therapy, however, crime and violence decreased by as much as 50 percent for at least a year. They hypothesize that cash reinforced therapy's lessons by prolonging practice and self-investment.

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