Skip navigation

Report

Governance Reforms of State-Owned Enterprises : Lessons from Four Case Studies (Egypt, Iraq, Morocco, and Tunisia)

PRIVATIZATION PROCEEDS REGULATORY FRAMEWORK REVOLUTION DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION EMPLOYMENT GENERATION PUBLIC PROCUREMENT FINANCING FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT LEGAL STRUCTURES FOREIGN OWNERSHIP DECISION-MAKING PROCESS PUBLIC INVESTMENTS PUBLIC SECTOR STATE PARTICIPATION GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE NATIONS RESPONSIBILITY LOCAL GOVERNMENTS POLITICIANS GOOD GOVERNANCE SOCIAL SAFETY NET HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITIES CORRUPTION DISCLOSURE INDEPENDENCE PUBLIC FUNDING OVERSIGHT MINISTERS STATE BANKS FINANCIAL AUTONOMY ADMINISTRATIVE AUTONOMY INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS FINANCIAL AUDITS REGULATORY BODY HUMAN RESOURCE PUBLIC POLICY STATES FOREIGN TRADE STATE FUNDING LACK OF TRANSPARENCY STATE OWNERSHIP EXECUTION LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AUTHORITY INFORMAL ECONOMY DECREE PUBLIC FUNDS EMBEZZLEMENT POLITICAL POWER LABOR PRODUCTIVITY SOCIAL SAFETY MINISTRIES FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS CENTRALIZATION LEGISLATION PUBLIC FINANCE REPRESENTATIVES SOCIAL RETURNS FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTION LEGAL FRAMEWORK PUBLIC INVESTMENT FISCAL HUMAN CAPITAL ACCOUNTABILITY TRANSPARENCY PRIVATE OWNERSHIP MANAGERIAL AUTONOMY PUBLIC POLICIES NATIONALIZATION STATE ENTERPRISES POLITICAL CONTROL STATE-OWNED ENTERPRISES FOREIGN INVESTMENT FINANCIAL DISCIPLINE GOVERNMENT REVENUE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE LEGAL FORM DECISION-MAKING POLITICAL INTERFERENCE INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY REGULATORY BODIES PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTATION STATE BUDGET BUREAUCRATIC POWER CITIZENS POLITICAL ELITES PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT PUBLIC DEBT REGULATORY REGIMES SOCIAL POLICIES CONSTITUTION GOVERNANCE ENFORCEMENT PUBLIC RESOURCES FINANCIAL CONTROL PUBLIC MANAGEMENT STATE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP REGIONS STATE SUBSIDIES STATE CONTROL ENTERPRISE REFORM HUMAN RESOURCES INTERNAL AUDIT MINISTRY OF FINANCE FINANCIAL INFORMATION FINANCIAL RISKS NATIONALISM STATE ASSETS STATE INTERVENTION LAW RISK MANAGEMENT AUDIT POOR GOVERNANCE PRIVATE SECTOR GROWTH GOVERNMENTS PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
76
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

Washington, DC
Middle East and North Africa
2015-10-08T20:24:31Z | 2015-10-08T20:24:31Z | 2015-08

The state-owned enterprise (SOE) landscape has become increasingly diverse. There used to be some relatively well-defined criteria, but with the growing complexity of state participation in the economy, there is no longer a uniform definition, and especially because the definition of a SOE has always been country-specific. SOE reforms can have major positive impacts not only by reducing fiscal risks by decreasing hidden subsidies, direct transfers, and overstaffing, but also by strengthening competition and developing capital markets. SOE reforms in developing countries began in the 1960s because of the poor performance of many of the SOEs. The reform movement sought to strengthen the internal capacity of SOEs. To enrich the discussion about possible avenues for performance-enhancing SOE reforms, this report presents the main principles of good governance of SOEs with references to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines on corporate governance of SOEs (OECD 2005). This document is divided into six parts: (1) an effective legal and regulatory framework for SOEs; (2) the state as an owner; (3) equitable treatment of shareholders; (4) relations with stakeholders; (5) transparency and disclosure; and (6) the responsibilities of the boards of SOEs.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period