Skip navigation

Report

Global Value Chain Integration and Productivity : Evidence from Enterprise Surveys in Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland

SKILLS EMPLOYMENT DISCUSSION COMPETITORS WORKFORCE ECONOMIC GROWTH PRODUCTION ACCESS TO TECHNOLOGY SKILLED WORKERS KNOWLEDGE SHARING MATERIALS SEARCH INCOME INTEREST BUYER CAPABILITY VALUE CHAIN SUPPLIER LABOR FORCE EXPORTS MULTINATIONAL WELFARE ENTERPRISE SURVEYS EFFECTS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT TRANSMISSION VARIABLES FIRM SIZE INPUTS LEADING ASSOCIATIONS RENTS KNOWLEDGE ECONOMIC ACTIVITY INSTITUTIONS LABOR MARKET DATA INFLUENCE MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES FOREIGN TRADE TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY GLOBAL ECONOMY ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY TRAINING EXCHANGE RATES CUSTOMS VALUE CHAINS BASE YEAR LABOR PRODUCTIVITY PRODUCTIVITY IMPERFECT COMPETITION INCREASING RETURNS BUYERS MARKETING MARKETS FIRM MULTINATIONALS ORGANIZATIONS LINKS LEARNING MATERIAL LABOR ENTERPRISES EXPORT MARKET EFFICIENCY CAPABILITIES MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY EQUITY R&D INVESTORS PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH HUMAN CAPITAL VALUE ADDED FIRMS WAGES DEFLATORS POLICIES INTERNATIONAL TRADE RESULTS PARTICIPATION VALUE COMPETITIVENESS FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT WORLD ECONOMY SCALE EFFECTS FOREIGN INVESTMENT ENTERPRISE SHARES MARKET BENCHMARK INDUSTRY PRODUCTIVITY ECONOMICS DIVERSIFICATION SKILLED LABOR MANAGEMENT REGRESSION ANALYSIS KNOWLEDGE FLOWS RESULT EXPANSION MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TRADE GDP INVESTOR UNDERSTANDING THEORY SUPPLY CHAINS MARKET SHARE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BUSINESS INVESTMENT ABSORPTIVE CAPACITY COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE INTEGRATION BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT SUPPLY INNOVATION INSTITUTION INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK GDP DEFLATOR SUPPLIERS DATABASE LABOUR SEE OUTSOURCING USES PRODUCTION COSTS CLIENTS COMPETITION
85
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa
2016-03-02T19:18:53Z | 2016-03-02T19:18:53Z | 2015-02-26

In order to adequately measure a firm’s participation in GVCs in this context, it is important to first identify the different forms through which GVC integration can affect domestic firms’ productivity. Integrating a country’s domestic suppliers into GVCs increases the possibility for productivity gains through exporting to a buyer abroad or supplying to a multinational in the country. But countries should not neglect the opportunities for productivity gains that GVC participation can provide from a buyer’s perspective. Instead of building a complete array of supply chains at home, firms can join existing supply chains of multinationals through cross-border trade in intermediates and components (Taglioni and Winkler 2015). While Farole and Winkler (2014) focus on the productivity spillovers from multinationals in a country, this note looks at the impact of cross-border sales to international buyers (exporting) or purchases of inputs from international sellers (importing) in GVCs. This note is structured as follows. Section two reviews the relevant literature with regard to productivity effects from GVC participation as well as the role of domestic firm characteristics in this context. Section three introduces the data and econometric model. In section four the author presents our regression results, while section five concludes.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period