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Understanding the Emerging Role of Motorcycles in African Cities : A Political Economy Perspective

ACCESSIBILITY AFFORDABLE PUBLIC TRANSPORT AIR BICYCLE BICYCLE TAXI BICYCLES BICYCLING BIKES BRIDGE BRIDGES BUS BUS COMPANIES BUS COMPANY BUS FARE BUS FARES BUS MARKET BUS OPERATIONS BUS ROUTES BUS SERVICE BUS SERVICES BUS STOPS BUS TRANSPORT BUS TRAVEL BUSES CAPACITY BUILDING CAR CARRY PASSENGERS CARS CITY TRANSPORT CLIMATE CHANGE COMMERCIAL SPEED COMMUTERS CONCESSIONS CONGESTION COST OF TRAVEL CURBS DAILY TRAFFIC DAILY TRAVEL DAILY TRIPS DRIVER LICENSING DRIVERS DRIVING ECONOMIES OF SCALE EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS EXTERNALITIES FARE STRUCTURE FLEETS FRAMEWORK FUEL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES GREENHOUSE GAS GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS HIGHER FARES HIGHWAY HIGHWAYS INCOME INTERCHANGES INTERSECTIONS JOURNEYS LABOR MARKET LAND USE LANES LOCAL AIR POLLUTION LOW CAR OWNERSHIP MAIN ROADS MEANS OF TRANSPORT MINI-BUS MINIBUS MINIBUS SERVICES MINIBUSES MOBILITY MODAL SPLIT MODE OF CHOICE MODE OF TRANSPORT MODES OF TRANSPORT MOTOR CYCLE MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES MOTORIZED TRANSPORT NEIGHBORHOODS NOISE PARATRANSIT PARKED VEHICLES PASSENGER PASSENGERS PATRONAGE PEAK PERIODS PERIPHERAL AREAS POLICE POLLUTION EMISSIONS POOR ROAD POOR ROADS POPULATION DENSITIES POPULATION GROWTH PRIVATE OPERATORS PRIVATE VEHICLE PROFIT MARGIN PROPERTY RIGHTS PUBLIC SUBSIDIES PUBLIC TRANSPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT MARKET PUBLIC TRANSPORT MODE PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICES PUBLIC TRANSPORT SUPPLY PUBLIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM PUBLIC TRANSPORT SYSTEMS PUBLIC TRANSPORT VEHICLES RADIAL CORRIDORS RECONSTRUCTION RED LIGHTS RIDER RIDERS RIDERSHIP ROAD ROAD ACCIDENTS ROAD DENSITY ROAD LINKS ROAD NETWORK ROAD QUALITY ROAD SPACE ROAD TRAFFIC ROADS ROADWAY ROUTE ROUTES SAFETY SAFETY HAZARDS SAFETY OF PEDESTRIANS SAFETY STANDARDS SECONDARY ROADS SHARING SHORT TRIPS SIDEWALKS STREET LIGHTING STREET SPACE SUBURBS TAX TAXI DRIVERS TAXI PASSENGERS TAXI TRIPS TAXIS TRAFFIC TRAFFIC ACCIDENT TRAFFIC CONGESTION TRAFFIC COUNTS TRAFFIC LAWS TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT TRAFFIC RULES TRAFFIC SURVEYS TRANSIT TRANSIT SYSTEM TRANSPARENCY TRANSPORT DEMAND TRANSPORT FARES TRANSPORT IMPROVEMENT TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURES TRANSPORT MARKETS TRANSPORT MODES TRANSPORT PLANNING TRANSPORT POLICY TRANSPORT SECTOR TRANSPORT SERVICE TRANSPORT SERVICES TRANSPORT SOLUTIONS TRANSPORT STATISTICS TRANSPORT STRATEGIES TRANSPORT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE TRANSPORTS TRAVEL DEMAND TRAVEL DISTANCES TRAVEL NEEDS TRAVEL PATTERNS TRIPS BY MODE TRIPS PER DAY URBAN ROADS URBAN SPRAWL URBAN TRANSPORT URBAN TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE URBAN TRANSPORT SERVICES URBAN TRANSPORT SYSTEM VEHICLE VEHICLE OWNERSHIP VEHICLE PARKING VEHICLES WALKING WHEELED VEHICLES
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa
2014-04-15T20:32:41Z | 2014-04-15T20:32:41Z | 2011-04

A decline in organized public transport systems has led to rapid growth in non-conventional means of public transport, initially provided by minibuses and shared taxi/vans, and more recently by commercial motorcycles. Unlike cities in South and East Asia, ownership and use of motorized two-wheelers as a personalized vehicle is very small in sub-Saharan cities. However, over the past decade there has been a significant growth in the use of motorcycles as a commercial public transport mode. While offering certain transport advantages in the form of easy maneuverability, ability to travel on poor roads, and demand responsiveness, commercial motorcycle service growth has also led to an increase in road accidents, traffic management problems, pervasive noise and increases in local air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Government efforts to regulate the market have had the contrary impact of compounding the problem by distorting market structures. The growth in the use of commercial motorcycles has also dispelled one of the commonly held illusions: fare controls in the public bus market are often justified to support affordability for a vast majority of low income population; however, commercial motorcycles are more expensive than the lowest bus fares, but are increasingly being patronized by the poor due to the inadequacy of bus services. This paper attempts to evaluate the commercial motorcycle mode used in the three cities of Douala, Lagos, and Kampala, based on their political economy context in order to draw general conclusions of value throughout Africa and the rest of the developing world. The evaluation underscores the linkages between governance failure and weak sector performance and highlights the need to adapt policy instruments to local political and economic context. Central to discussion is the necessity to develop a participation framework driven by open communications across a wide spectrum of stakeholders.

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