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Climate Change Impacts on Animal Husbandry in Africa : A Ricardian Analysis

AGRICULTURAL LAND AGRICULTURE ANIMAL ANIMAL DISEASES ANIMAL HUSBANDRY ANIMAL PERFORMANCE ANIMAL POWER ANIMAL PRODUCTS ANIMALS ASSESSMENT REPORT ATMOSPHERE BARNS BEAR BEEF BEEF CATTLE BEES BREEDING BREEDS BULLS BUTTER CAMELS CATTLE POPULATION CHEESE CHICKEN CHICKENS CLIMATE CLIMATE CHANGE CLIMATE CHANGES CLIMATE IMPACTS CLIMATE MODELS CLIMATE SENSITIVITY CLIMATE SYSTEM CLIMATE VARIABLES CLIMATIC CHANGE CO2 COMMUNAL LANDS CROPS DAIRY DAIRY CATTLE DAIRY FARM DAIRY FARMING DESERTS DISEASE VECTORS DROUGHT ECONOMICS ECOSYSTEMS EGGS ELASTICITY ELECTRICITY EQUIPMENT EXPOSURE EXTENSION FARM FARMERS FARMS FEED FEEDING FEEDLOT CATTLE FEEDLOTS FORAGE FOREST FORESTRY FORESTS FOWL GENDER GENETICS GLOBAL WARMING GOAT GOATS GRASSLAND GRASSLANDS GRAZING GRAZING ANIMALS GRAZING LAND GREENHOUSE GAS HEAT WAVES HORSES HUMAN ECOLOGY INCOMES INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE IPCC ISSUES LAND VALUE LEATHER LIVESTOCK LIVESTOCK DISEASES LIVESTOCK ENVIRONMENT LIVESTOCK FARMER LIVESTOCK FARMS LIVESTOCK HUSBANDRY LIVESTOCK INCOME LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT LIVESTOCK OWNERS LIVESTOCK OWNERSHIP LIVESTOCK PRODUCT LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION LIVESTOCK PRODUCTIVITY LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS LIVESTOCK RESEARCH LIVESTOCK SECTOR MANURE MEAT MILK MILK PRODUCTION MILKING MILKING EQUIPMENT NEW TECHNOLOGIES NORTH AFRICA NUTRITION PARASITES PASTURE PASTURE PRODUCTIVITY PIG PIGS POPULATION DENSITIES POPULATION DENSITY POPULATION ESTIMATES PRECIPITATION RAINFALL RANGELANDS SAHEL SATELLITE DATA SHEEP SMALL RUMINANTS SOIL SOILS SPECIES SPECIES COMPOSITION TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE CHANGES TEMPERATURE DATA TOURISM TRYPANOSOMIASIS VETERINARY VETERINARY CARE WATER USE WOOL WOOL PRODUCTION
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa
2012-06-07T17:46:03Z | 2012-06-07T17:46:03Z | 2007-06

This paper analyzes the impact of climate change on animal husbandry in Africa. It regresses the net revenue from raising animals in small and large farms across Africa on climate, soil, and other control variables to test the climate sensitivity of livestock. The study is based on a survey of over 9,000 farmers across 11 countries conducted by the World Bank and the Global Environment Facility. From this dataset, 5,400 farms were found to rely on livestock. The paper develops models to test whether the climate coefficients of small and large farms are similar. It turns out that small farms tend to be more labor intensive, rely on native stocks, and have few animals. Large farms tend to be more commercial operations, with much larger stocks and more modern approaches. The analysis finds that warming is good for small farms because they can substitute animals that are heat tolerant. Large farms, by contrast, are more dependent on cattle, which are not heat tolerant. The wetter scenarios are likely to be harmful to grazing animals because greater rainfall implies a shift from grasslands to forests, an increase in harmful disease vectors, and a shift from livestock to crops. Overall, because large farms dominate the sector, African livestock net revenues are expected to fall. However, if future climates turn out to be dry, livestock net revenue will increase. At least against the risk of dryness, livestock offer a good substitute for crops.

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