Skip navigation

Working Paper

Public Spending and Growth in an Economic and Monetary Union : The Case of West Africa

GOVERNMENT BUDGET CONSTRAINT DEFICIT EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES PUBLIC CONSUMPTION ECONOMIC GROWTH ACCOUNTING INTANGIBLE ASSETS FISCAL BALANCES REVENUE MOBILIZATION CAPITAL ACCUMULATION PUBLIC REVENUES PUBLIC ECONOMICS NET LENDING FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COEFFICIENTS FISCAL DEFICITS EFFECTIVENESS OF GOVERNMENT TOTAL PUBLIC EXPENDITURES PUBLIC EDUCATION CREDIBLE BUDGET PUBLIC INVESTMENTS PUBLIC SECTOR GOVERNMENT SPENDING ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONS CURRENT EXPENDITURES PROGRAMS SERVICES PUBLIC SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT REVENUES FISCAL POLICY GROWTH MODEL TAX BURDEN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS TAX SYSTEMS LEVEL OF PUBLIC SPENDING TAX LOWER TAXES BENEFICIARIES INFLATION TOTAL PUBLIC EXPENDITURE PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PUBLIC HEALTH BUDGET POVERTY REDUCTION GOVERNMENT CONSUMPTION SUBNATIONAL MACROECONOMIC STABILITY CAPITAL BUDGET PUBLIC EXPENDITURE ON HEALTH POLICY PRIORITIES LEVELS OF PUBLIC SPENDING TOTAL EXPENDITURE GOVERNMENT POLICY FISCAL REPORTING EFFECTIVENESS OF PUBLIC SPENDING CAPITAL FORMATION INFLATIONARY PRESSURES RECURRENT EXPENDITURES MONETARY UNION BUDGET EXECUTION TRANSFERS NATURAL DISASTERS DEBT PRIVATE INVESTMENT INFLATION RATE BUDGET DEFICIT CAPITAL ASSETS BUDGET DEFICITS CAPITAL EXPENDITURE TAX REVENUES DATA ANALYSIS POLICY DECISIONS FISCAL VARIABLES NATURAL RESOURCES DEBT SERVICE PUBLIC INVESTMENT EDUCATION SPENDING INFRASTRUCTURE TAXES PUBLIC FIXED INVESTMENT HEALTH SPENDING EXPENDITURE INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT DATA AVAILABILITY DEBT RATIO BUDGET CONSTRAINT GROSS FIXED CAPITAL FORMATION ACCOUNTABILITY GOVERNMENT BUDGET TRANSPARENCY CIVILIAN CENTRAL GOVERNMENT PUBLIC EXPENDITURE BUDGET SURPLUS FINANCIAL CAPITAL BUDGET BALANCE POLICY MAKERS PUBLIC SPENDING ALLOCATIONS PUBLIC ACCOUNTS BUDGETS PUBLIC BUDGET CENTRAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE PUBLIC EXPENDITURES REVENUE LEVELS EXPENDITURES PRIVATE SECTOR PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS TRADE LIBERALIZATION DEBT RATIOS PUBLIC DEBT TAX REVENUE CAPITAL SPENDING TAXATION RATIO OF PUBLIC SPENDING FISCAL SPACE DOMESTIC INVESTMENT GROWTH RATE PUBLIC CAPITAL EFFECTIVENESS OF GOVERNMENT SPENDING FISCAL STABILITY TOTAL SPENDING FISCAL MANAGEMENT POVERTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION DEBT SERVICE PAYMENTS FISCAL BALANCE UNCERTAINTY EXPENDITURE COMPOSITION REVENUE PRIVATE CONSUMPTION COUNTRY ECONOMISTS CAPITAL EXPENDITURES POLICY FORMULATION TOTAL GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE EXCHANGE RATE FISCAL DISCIPLINE FISCAL REVENUE PUBLIC SPENDING CAPITAL INVESTMENT PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT PUBLIC EMPLOYEES PRICE INDEX OUTCOMES CIVIL SERVICE GROWTH POTENTIAL POLICY CHANGES PUBLIC REVENUE EXTERNAL BORROWING TOTAL PUBLIC SPENDING
68
0

Attachments [ 0 ]

There are no files associated with this item.

More Details

World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | West Africa
2015-11-10T16:21:49Z | 2015-11-10T16:21:49Z | 2015-10

The focus of the paper is on how public spending volume, composition (current versus capital), and quality are linked to the per capita growth rates of the West Africa economic and monetary union (WAEMU) countries, which have been fluctuating and remain relatively low compared to other parts of the world. The empirical analysis covers the period 2000-2013. The results indicate that total public spending has a significant impact on growth. While the impact of the capital component is positive and statistically significant, the effect of the current component is consistently negative, but not significant. When the capital component is further split into two: public fixed capital investment and public other capital expenditures, defined as total public capital expenditure minus public fixed capital investment, the results show that not only physical capital formation but also human capital spending is important for growth in the WAEMU group. While the volatility measure for public investment has a clear negative and statistically significant impact on growth, the quality of public fixed investment has a positive impact. The findings also indicate that fiscal deficits have not been an important constraint to the effectiveness of government spending on growth, reflecting the fiscal discipline achieved in the union. On the other hand, the debt-to-gross domestic product (GDP) ratio clearly shows a significant negative impact on growth, indicating the risk associated with debt distress. Total fiscal revenue has a significant and positive effect on growth, most likely indicating relatively low levels of fiscal revenues to GDP ratios, partially boosted by natural resources, coupled with grants. In each regression specification, it is observed that the contributions of both trade openness and private investment on growth are positive and significant. The results also indicate that the quality of institutions, measured by an index of bureaucracy quality, is critical to enhancing the positive effect of public spending on growth. The results with country effects indicate that, at the individual country level, capital public expenditures are clearly much more relevant in explaining growth changes than current expenditures. The findings are robust to different regression methodologies, as well as the inclusion of short- and medium-term data.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Select desired time period