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Economic & Sector Work :: Pre-2003 Economic or Sector Report

Missing Food : The Case of Postharvest Grain Losses in Sub-Saharan Africa

ACCESS TO MARKETS ADOPTION OF TECHNOLOGIES AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT AGRICULTURAL INPUTS AGRICULTURAL POLICY AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE ANIMAL FEED ANIMAL PRODUCTS ATTRIBUTES BAGGING BALANCE SHEET BARLEY BASIC BEANS BEER BEST PRACTICES BUSINESS MODELS BUYERS BY-PRODUCTS CAPABILITIES CAPITAL ASSETS CASH CROPS CASH FLOW CASSAVA CEREAL CROPS CEREAL IMPORTS CGIAR CHOICE OF TECHNOLOGY CIMMYT CLEANLINESS CLIMATIC CONDITIONS COMMERCIAL FARMERS COMMERCIAL VALUE COMMERCIALIZATION COMMODITY COMMODITY PRICES COMMUNITIES COMPONENTS CONNECTIVITY CONSUMER DEMAND CONTAINERS COOKING COPYING COPYRIGHT COWPEAS CROP CROP PRODUCTION DEGREE OF MECHANIZATION DRAINAGE E-MAIL E-MAIL ADDRESSES ECOLOGICAL ZONES ELECTRICITY ENABLING ENVIRONMENT ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS ENTRY POINT ENTRY POINTS EQUIPMENT EXPORT MARKETS EXTRACTS FAIRS FAO FARM FARM ACTIVITIES FARM MANAGEMENT FARM PRODUCTIVITY FARM STORAGE FARMER FARMERS FARMING FARMS FERTILIZER FINANCIAL SUPPORT FLOUR FOOD AID FOOD AVAILABILITY FOOD CROPS FOOD DISTRIBUTION FOOD INSECURITY FOOD LOSSES FOOD POLICY FOOD POLICY RESEARCH FOOD PRICES FOOD QUALITY FOOD SECURITY FOOD SHORTAGES FOOD SUPPLY FOODS FRUIT FUNGI GLOBAL MARKET GRAIN GRAIN BORER GRAIN CONSUMPTION GRAIN CROPS GRAIN HANDLING GRAIN PRODUCTION GRAIN QUALITY GRAIN STORAGE GRAINS GREEN REVOLUTION HARVESTING HARVESTS HAZARD HIGH YIELDING VARIETIES HIGH-YIELDING VARIETIES HOUSEHOLD FOOD SECURITY HYGIENE IFPRI INDEXES INFORMATION CHANNELS INFORMATION FLOW INFORMATION NETWORK INFORMATION SHARING INFORMATION SYSTEM INFORMATION SYSTEMS INNOVATION INNOVATIONS INSECT PESTS INSTITUTION INTERNATIONAL FOOD POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE INTERNATIONAL MARKETS INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE INVENTORY IRRI JUTE KNOWLEDGE BASE LAMB LICENSES MAIZE MAIZE COBS MAIZE GRAINS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS MANUFACTURING MARKET ANALYSIS MARKET INFORMATION MARKET LIBERALIZATION MARKET OPPORTUNITY MARKET ORIENTATION MARKET PLACES MARKET PRICES MARKETING MARKETING BOARDS MATERIAL MEDIA MILLET MOLD NATURAL RESOURCES NETWORKS NEW TECHNOLOGY OILSEEDS OUTGROWER SCHEMES PACKAGING PACKING PADDY PANICLES PATHOGENS PEST CONTROL PESTICIDES PHOTO PLANTAINS PLANTING PRICE LEVELS PRICE POLICY PRICE STABILIZATION PRICE VOLATILITY PRIVATE SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT PROCUREMENT PRODUCE PRODUCT QUALITY PUBLIC ACCESS QUERIES RADIO RENEWABLE RESOURCES RESULT RESULTS RICE RICE CULTIVATION RICE RESEARCH SALES SEED SILO SILOS SMALL FARMERS SMALL PRODUCERS SOIL FERTILITY SOIL TYPES SORGHUM SORGHUM GRAINS SPREAD STAPLE FOODS STOCKS STORAGE CAPACITY STORAGE FACILITIES SUBSISTENCE FARMERS SUBSTITUTION SUPPLIERS SUPPLY CHAIN SUPPLY CHAINS SURPLUS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TECHNICAL EXPERTS TECHNICAL SKILLS TECHNICAL SUPPORT TECHNICAL TRAINING TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES TECHNOLOGY PUSH TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TELEPHONE TELEVISION TILLAGE TRANSACTION TUBERS USERS VALUE CHAIN VALUE CHAINS VEGETABLES VIDEO WAREHOUSE WAREHOUSES WEB WEB SITE WEB SITES WEBSITES WFP WHEAT WHOLESALERS WORLD FOOD PROGRAM WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME YIELDS
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Washington, DC
Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa
2012-03-19T10:14:27Z | 2012-03-19T10:14:27Z | 2011-04

Low-income, food-deficit countries have become especially concerned about the global and national food situation over the past three years. While the proximate cause of this heightened concern was the surge in food prices that began in 2006 and peaked in mid-2008, concerns remain for other reasons, among them the higher market-clearing price levels that now seem to prevail, continuing price volatility, and the risk of intermittent food shortages occurring repeatedly far into the future. For lower-income Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries, ongoing contributing factors include persistently low productivity, difficulty adapting to climate change, financial difficulties (inability to handle the burden of high food or fuel prices or a credit squeeze), and increased dependence on food aid. Yet there is an additional, often-forgotten factor that exacerbates food insecurity: postharvest losses (PHL). They can and do occur all along the chain from farm to fork, which reduces real income for all consumers. This especially affects the poor; as such a high percentage of their disposable income is devoted to staple foods. This report is based on the desk study undertaken by experts of the U.K. Natural Resources Institute (NRI). Data were collected by direct contact (e-mail or telephone), with authorities holding information on past and current projects; by searching the Internet for details about projects; and by reviewing published and 'gray' literature. Data were also collected from the personal experiences of the NRI review team who had worked on numerous and diverse projects to reduce grain PHL in SSA over the last 30 years and from experts in the field. These experts were identified and asked to complete a questionnaire that would draw out their experiences to indicate the weakest links in the postharvest chain, the interventions that deserve to be prioritized for future action, and those that should be avoided. Of about 40 invited respondents, a total of 20 returned completed (or partially completed) questionnaires.

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