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Working Paper

Internationalizing Sub-Saharan Africa’s Education and Health Services

EMPLOYMENT RISKS VIRTUAL UNIVERSITIES UNIVERSITY DEGREE COLLEGE BRAIN DRAIN TEACHERS HIGHER LEARNING ACADEMIC STAFF SKILLED WORKERS KNOWLEDGE SHARING CAREER DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TERTIARY ENROLLMENT PHARMACISTS GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE STUDENT LOAN SCHEMES GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS LAWS TUITION ADEQUATE EDUCATION ACADEMIC MANAGEMENT LEARNING CENTERS HEALTH CARE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CAREER HIGHER EDUCATION PAPERS HEALTH DISTANCE LEARNING SKILLED PROFESSIONALS FOREIGN PROFESSIONALS COLLEGES DISCIPLINES MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION INFORMATION SYSTEMS QUALITY TEACHING EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION HIGHER EDUCATION SECTOR ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS INFORMATION ASYMMETRIES FACULTY RESEARCH INCENTIVES PUBLIC HEALTH DAY CARE HIGH SCHOOLS RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS PROFESSORS EDUCATION SECTOR KNOWLEDGE PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES LEARNING ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES UNIVERSITY COUNCIL TERTIARY EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS DISTANCE LEARNING INSTITUTIONS CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES QUALITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACCREDITATION MECHANISMS PATIENTS PATIENT GRADUATE DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMS INSTITUTIONAL ACCREDITATION HEALTH INDICATORS ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH REPORT SCHOLARSHIPS FOREIGN STUDENTS COST OF EDUCATION NURSES MIGRATION MINISTRIES HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS SCHOLARS PROFESSIONAL EXAMINATIONS MARKETING LEARNING MEDICAL SCHOOL GRADUATES RESEARCH PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS TRADE IN EDUCATION SERVICES INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION UNIVERSITY EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM TEACHING MIGRANTS HIGHER EDUCATION QUALITY FOREIGN UNIVERSITIES STUDENT LOANS MEDICAL TREATMENT ACCESS TO INFORMATION HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEMS EDUCATION SYSTEMS MEDICAL EDUCATION DIASPORA HUMAN CAPITAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION WORKERS STUDENT POPULATION EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS SURGERY GLOBAL MARKET SCIENCE UNIVERSITY LEVEL SOCIAL SERVICES IMMIGRATION LAWS TUITION FEES STUDENT ENROLLMENTS STUDENT SCHOOLS SURVEILLANCE STUDENT MOBILITY COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES MEDICAL SPECIALISTS HEALTH POLICY MEDICAL SERVICES DISTANCE EDUCATION DEGREE REQUIREMENTS RESEARCHERS PRIVATE EDUCATION EXPENDITURES BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP SOCIAL SCIENCE DECISION MAKING EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS TECHNICAL COLLEGES CAREERS INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS CURRICULUM TEACHER ACCREDITATION SYSTEMS BUSINESS SCHOOL INTERNET REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES ACCREDITATION HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS PHYSICIANS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT ACADEMIC PROGRAMS STUDENT LOAN CLINICS PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTES HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH UNIVERSITY WELLNESS INSTRUCTION SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM HUMAN CAPITAL INVESTMENT MEDICAL DOCTORS UNIVERSITY STUDENTS QUALITY ASSURANCE ACCREDITATION BODIES STRATEGY INTERNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION REGISTRATION FAMILIES DEGREES PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS HOSPITALS SCHOOL SECONDARY EDUCATION TERTIARY EDUCATION HEALTH SERVICES IMPLEMENTATION TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS INTERPRETERS PRIVATE SECTOR INVOLVEMENT NURSING MEDICAL SCHOOLS UNIVERSITIES
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Africa | East Africa | Southern Africa
2015-10-21T21:20:43Z | 2015-10-21T21:20:43Z | 2015

This paper summarizes the nature and determinants of trade in education and health services in a selected group of countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. The paper presents results from new, innovative data collection methods, such as crowdsourcing, to shed some light on the magnitude, determinants, and restrictions on intra-African trade in education and health services. Assessments of trade and regulatory barriers, based on results from regulatory surveys conducted in selected East African countries, and case studies of success stories and less favorable experiences are then used to develop policy recommendations for using trade and regional integration more strategically to improve outcomes in education and health. The analysis shows that to turn these sectors around, policy action is required in the areas of education, domestic regulation, trade policy, labor mobility, and information and communications technologies at the national and international levels. To retain some of the scarce health workers in the region and enhance the region’s competitiveness in providing education and health services, African countries should allow for freer mobility of teachers and health care professionals.

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