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ICTs for Climate Change Adaptation in Africa

ACCESS TO DATA ACIDIFICATION ADAPTATION ACTIVITIES ADAPTATION EFFORTS ADAPTATION FRAMEWORK ADAPTATION IN AGRICULTURE ADAPTATION INTERVENTIONS ADAPTATION NEEDS ADAPTATION PLANNING ADAPTATION PLANS ADAPTATION POLICY ADAPTATION POLICY DEVELOPMENT ADAPTATION SUPPORT ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTING ADAPTIVE CAPACITY ADAPTIVE CAPACITY OF FARMERS AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION ATMOSPHERE AVAILABILITY OF WATER BASES CAPACITY BUILDING CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY-BUILDING CARBON CIVIL SOCIETY CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES CLIMATE CLIMATE CHANGE CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION STRATEGIES CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS CLIMATE CHANGE INFORMATION CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION CLIMATE CHANGE PROJECTIONS CLIMATE CONDITIONS CLIMATE DISASTERS CLIMATE IMPACTS CLIMATE MODELLING CLIMATE MODELLING SYSTEM CLIMATE MONITORING CLIMATE PARAMETERS CLIMATE PROOFING CLIMATE RESPONSE CLIMATE VARIABILITY CLIMATIC VARIATIONS CO2 CONFRONTING CLIMATE CHANGE CYCLONES DECISION MAKING DECREASE IN RAINFALL DEFORESTATION DIRECT IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE DISASTER PREPAREDNESS DISASTER RISK DISASTER RISK REDUCTION DRY SEASON ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMIC SECTORS ECOSYSTEM ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY PRICES EXTREME CLIMATE EVENTS EXTREME EVENTS FINANCIAL RESOURCES FINANCIAL SERVICES FIRE MANAGEMENT FLOOD FLOODING FLOODS FOREST FOREST RESERVES FOREST RESOURCES FORESTRY FORESTRY POLICY FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE GLACIAL LAKE GLACIAL LAKE OUTBURST GLACIAL LAKES GLOBAL EMISSIONS GREENHOUSE GREENHOUSE GAS GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS ICE ICE FIELDS IMPACT OF CLIMATE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE INCOME INLAND LAKES INTERNATIONAL RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE LAND MANAGEMENT LOCAL COMMUNITIES LOCAL COMMUNITY LOWER PRICES MANAGEMENT OF WATER MANAGING CLIMATE RISK METEOROLOGICAL DATA METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION METEOROLOGY MONSOONS NATIONAL ADAPTATION NATIONAL WATER POLICY NATURAL DISASTER OCEANS POLICY MAKERS PRECIPITATION RAIN RAINFALL RAINFALL PATTERNS RAINFALL VARIABILITY REGIONAL CLIMATE RIVERS SEA WALLS SEASON STRATEGIES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE INCREASES TEMPERATURES VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE WATER MANAGEMENT WATER POINTS WATER RESOURCES WATER SUPPLY WIND WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY
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World Bank, Washington, DC
Africa | Africa
2014-07-28T20:45:53Z | 2014-07-28T20:45:53Z | 2014

Like other regions of the world, Africa is beginning to experience the impacts of human-induced climate change. These observed changes in climate parameters have not occurred uniformly across Africa. Mitigation is concerned with reducing the level of greenhouse gas emissions in the Earth's atmosphere that are the principal causes of climate change. Adaptation is concerned not with prevention but, in the words of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, with adjustments in human and or natural systems to reduce adverse impacts or take advantage of opportunities that may arise from it. Information and communication technology (ICT) have had an increasing impact on economic and social development over the past two decades, resulting from their capacity to generate and disseminate information, to facilitate the coordination of different actors in and beyond government, and to make government, business, and development processes more efficient. ICTs also have a complex relationship with sustainability and with the underlying cause of climate change. This relationship can be described in terms of the effects of ICTs: first order (direct) effects concern the impacts which ICTs have on climate change, in particular the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the production, use and disposal of communications equipment and services, accounting for between 2 and 2.5 percent of global emissions. Second order (indirect) effects concern the role ICTs can play in reducing emissions resulting from other industrial sectors, by adopting ICTs to improve efficiency and production. Third order (societal) effects result from large-scale changes in social and economic behavior resulting from widespread use of ICTs, including changing patterns of trade, production and consumption, and global to local engagement of citizens in decision making.

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